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    based on civil disobedience, what statement did thoreau, like his modern-day successors, hope to make with his imprisonment? he wanted to show the great unfairness of the prison system. he wanted to prove himself as a martyr for his cause. he wanted to suggest that one should be willing to go to great lengths for a belief. he wanted to suggest that imprisonment was the only valid form of political protest.

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    get based on civil disobedience, what statement did thoreau, like his modern-day successors, hope to make with his imprisonment? he wanted to show the great unfairness of the prison system. he wanted to prove himself as a martyr for his cause. he wanted to suggest that one should be willing to go to great lengths for a belief. he wanted to suggest that imprisonment was the only valid form of political protest. from EN Bilgi.

    Based on 'civil disobedience,' what statement did thoreau, like his modern

    Correct answer ✅ to the question: Based on 'civil disobedience,' what statement did thoreau, like his modern-day successors, hope to make with his imprisonment? he wanted to

    English, 10.10.2019 18:00, kayla114035

    Based on "civil disobedience," what statement did thoreau, like his modern-day successors, hope to make with his imprisonment?

    he wanted to show the great unfairness of the prison system.

    he wanted to prove himself as a martyr for his cause.

    he wanted to suggest that one should be willing to go to great lengths for a belief.

    he wanted to suggest that imprisonment was the only valid form of political protest.

    Answers: 2 Get

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    Ch1. Sec. 7 Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Considering "Civil Disobedience," why did both Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. engage in acts of civil disobedience? to take a stand against government taxation to protest government policies they believed were unjust to protest slavery and the Mexican-American War to take a stand against unfair laws in the 1950s and '60s, In "Civil Disobedience," what does Thoreau think about right after he wonders if he could have been of service to his community? whether everyone in the town is half-witted and dull the significance of the wall between himself and others that imprisoning him would not solve the problem that he is truly the only person in the town to pay a tax, In "Civil Disobedience," what is Thoreau's view of the state at the end of the essay? He thinks the state does not appreciate individual worth. He finds the state guilty of gross misjudgment of his actions. He feels sorry for the state for not acting in a sensible way. He considers the state's actions indicative of society's unfairness. and more.

    Ch1. Sec. 7

    4.8 4 Reviews

    Considering "Civil Disobedience," why did both Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. engage in acts of civil disobedience?

    to take a stand against government taxation

    to protest government policies they believed were unjust

    to protest slavery and the Mexican-American War

    to take a stand against unfair laws in the 1950s and '60s

    Click card to see definition 👆

    to protest government policies they believed were unjust

    Click again to see term 👆

    In "Civil Disobedience," what does Thoreau think about right after he wonders if he could have been of service to his community?

    whether everyone in the town is half-witted and dull

    the significance of the wall between himself and others

    that imprisoning him would not solve the problem

    that he is truly the only person in the town to pay a tax

    Click card to see definition 👆

    the significance of the wall between himself and others

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/10 Created by zomb1eslayer51

    Terms in this set (10)

    Considering "Civil Disobedience," why did both Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. engage in acts of civil disobedience?

    to take a stand against government taxation

    to protest government policies they believed were unjust

    to protest slavery and the Mexican-American War

    to take a stand against unfair laws in the 1950s and '60s

    to protest government policies they believed were unjust

    In "Civil Disobedience," what does Thoreau think about right after he wonders if he could have been of service to his community?

    whether everyone in the town is half-witted and dull

    the significance of the wall between himself and others

    that imprisoning him would not solve the problem

    that he is truly the only person in the town to pay a tax

    the significance of the wall between himself and others

    In "Civil Disobedience," what is Thoreau's view of the state at the end of the essay?

    He thinks the state does not appreciate individual worth.

    He finds the state guilty of gross misjudgment of his actions.

    He feels sorry for the state for not acting in a sensible way.

    He considers the state's actions indicative of society's unfairness.

    He feels sorry for the state for not acting in a sensible way.

    What is Thoreau's first thought upon being imprisoned in "Civil Disobedience"?

    He is concerned about how long he will be there.

    He wishes to get out of prison as soon as possible.

    He considers the prison a foolish institution.

    He wonders why he was put behind bars.

    He considers the prison a foolish institution.

    What does "Civil Disobedience" suggest about the public opinion of tax evasion in Thoreau's time?

    Tax evasion was only a moderate crime.

    The evasion of taxes was considered highly disrespectful to the state.

    If allowed to continue, tax evasion was a serious offense.

    Tax evasion was one of the more grave crimes one could commit.

    If allowed to continue, tax evasion was a serious offense.

    Based on Thoreau's opinion about the Mexican-American War and slavery in the United States, why did he most likely refuse to pay the poll taxes, as described in "Civil Disobedience"?

    He desired to learn more about the government.

    He wanted to expose fraud in the government.

    He supported the government's position.

    He disagreed with the government's actions.

    He disagreed with the government's actions.

    Read the excerpt from a letter Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote while imprisoned in Birmingham Jail in 1963.

    One who breaks an unjust law must do so openly, lovingly, and with a willingness to accept the penalty.

    Based on his behavior in "Civil Disobedience," how would Thoreau most likely feel about King's statement?

    He would believe that his reasons and King's reasons for protest were completely unrelated.

    He would disagree with King's belief that one must accept the penalty for political protest.

    He would believe that King did not understand the nature of political protest.

    He would agree with King that one should engage in political protest peacefully.

    He would disagree with King's belief that one must accept the penalty for political protest.

    Based on evidence of his personality in "Civil Disobedience," what effect would a longer jail stay most likely have had on Thoreau?

    It would have made him doubt himself.

    It would have encouraged him to engage in other crimes.

    It would have hardened his resolve to assert his rights.

    It would have caused him to pay the poll tax.

    It would have hardened his resolve to assert his rights.

    Which best describes one way in which "Civil Disobedience" impacted people and events later in history?

    It fortified the beliefs of those who thought the government acted unfairly.

    It made readers want to immediately engage in protests.

    It gave readers an insight into Thoreau's life.

    It acted as a catalyst for rapid political change.

    It fortified the beliefs of those who thought the government acted unfairly.

    Based on "Civil Disobedience," what statement did Thoreau, like his modern-day successors, hope to make with his imprisonment?

    He wanted to show the great unfairness of the prison system.

    Source : quizlet.com

    Civil Disobedience Section Two Summary & Analysis

    A summary of Part X (Section2) in Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Civil Disobedience and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

    Civil Disobedience

    Civil Disobedience Henry David Thoreau

    Study Guide Summary

    Section Two

    Summary Section Two Page 1 Page 2

    Thoreau maintains that "Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison." This is true today in Massachusetts, he says: in prison, a person can live with honor among the victims of injustice. Perhaps a person might think she could not be useful in jail, would be incapacitated to bring about change. In response to such a person, Thoreau replies that she does know how much stronger truth is than error--how much more powerfully a person can combat injustice once that person has experienced it for herself. He urges the reader to "cast your whole vote" against injustice, meaning not just a ballot but one's whole influence. A minority is irresistible when it uses its whole weight. For, if given the choice of renouncing slavery and war on the one hand and keeping all just men in prison on the other, the state will choose to eliminate its unjust policies.

    Thoreau explains that he has hitherto focused on imprisonment instead of confiscation of goods, primarily because those who are most committed to justice have typically avoided accumulating property. To these people, even a slight tax probably appears exorbitant because the state offers so few services for them. Furthermore, the rich man is always sold to the institution that made him rich; as money increases, virtue decreases. The only questions wealth nurtures is the question of how to spend that money--it never fosters self-questioning and moral consideration. Thus, focusing on material wealth, a person loses his moral ground. With greater life "means," his real opportunity to live is diminished. Thus, the best thing a person can do for his culture when he is rich is to attempt to live his life as he did while he was poor.

    Thoreau then addresses those readers who might raise the concern that people need the government's protection and who are worried about the consequences of civil disobedience to their property and family. He says that he himself would never want to think himself dependent on the State's protection. However, he acknowledges that if he refuses to pay taxes it will mean he will lose his property and that the state will harass his family. This is "hard," he admits: It is hard to live honestly and yet outwardly comfortably at the same time. Thus, he concludes that it is not worthwhile to accumulate property. One should be self-sufficient and farm only a small crop. "You must live within yourself," he tells the reader. He quotes Confucius as saying that if a state is not governed by reason, then riches are a source of shame. He reasons that it costs him less "in every sense" to pay the penalty of disobeying the State than it would to obey it. That is, less is lost in forgoing the government's protection and in suffering harassment to one's family, than in sacrificing one's integrity in passive compliance with the government's unjust policies. For if he were to sacrifice his integrity, Thoreau explains, "I should feel as if I were worth less" as a person.

    Commentary

    Thoreau makes an important philosophical point here about the ways in which people are (and are not) responsible for harm that befalls others. Most significantly, he argues that individuals are responsible for injustices that they participate in. Participation has a broad meaning for Thoreau: Being a member of an unjust institution, even being a citizen of an unjust nation, makes a person a participant in injustice. Even paying taxes to an evil government is enough to leave a person morally tarnished. For this reason, Thoreau argues that people have a duty to disassociate from the government and to not support it either financially or as persons. However, Thoreau does not argue that there is a parallel duty to promote as much good as possible in the world. People have a duty not to cause evil, but they do not have a duty to work against evil that they did not cause. Morality does not require that a person work to bring about a "better" world. Rather, a person must simply not make the world any worse. Thoreau's distinction here is linked to his individualism: He argues that each person should live for himself and take advantage of his short time on earth to follow his own interests and goals. For Thoreau, a person can very legitimately have concerns that must take priority over improving the world; individuals should maintain their integrity by staying true to their values and concerns. However, precisely for this reason, a person is responsible for the evil that they perform--both directly and indirectly, via tacit support. Thus, there is a special duty not to cause or participate in evil.

    It is also worth considering how Thoreau's ideas relate to democracy. Thoreau was certainly critical of democracy and its rule by the majority; thus, for him, if civil disobedience damaged democratic institutions, there was no real harm done. However, those people who do value democracy might question how compatible civil disobedience is with this system of government. Democracy is ultimately about compromise; people accept the decision of the majority because they know that others will accept their decisions when they are in the majority. However, Thoreau argues that any such compromise on ethical issues is a moral sell-out. A person should never participate in evil, not even if it is the law. Therefore, Thoreau does not play by democracy's "rules of the game." Rather, he calls for people to remove themselves from the government when they believe that they are being asked to do something wrong. However, Thoreau does not fully disobey democracy's rules either: He accepts that by breaking one law (e.g., the law to pay taxes) he will be punished under another (criminal) law, and he does not say that people should try to avoid the consequences of their disobedience-- they should not go into hiding or exile; they should not resist arrest. Rather, society must see the consequences of its laws; by staying in jail, we force society to consider whether it is willing to keep all just men in jail. Thus, Thoreau does believe in following certain laws--for this, too, can effectively change society. Do you think there are different duties of disobedience depending on the kind of law passed and the ability of those affected by the law to change it?

    Source : www.sparknotes.com

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