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    Food safety when cooking

    betterhealth.vic.gov.au

    Healthy eating

    Food safety when cooking

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    Food safety when cooking Actions for this page Summary

    Cook food properly – to at least 75 °C or hotter.

    Use a thermometer to check the temperature of cooked foods.

    If you use a microwave, check that the food is cooked evenly throughout.

    Cook foods made from eggs thoroughly.

    Cool and store cooked food as soon as possible.

    Reheat food until steaming hot.

    On this page

    People at risk from food poisoning

    Safety when cooking high-risk foods

    High-risk foods and the temperature danger zone

    Cook all food to a temperature of 75 °C

    Food safety with raw eggs

    Food safety and microwave cooking

    Cooling and storing food

    Reheat food to steaming hot

    Where to get help

    The way we cook our food is as important as the way we prepare and store it. Inadequate cooking is a common cause of food poisoning. Cross-contamination from raw to cooked foods, such as from hands, chopping boards or utensils, can also cause food poisoning. Most foods, especially meat, poultry, fish and eggs, should be cooked thoroughly to kill most types of food poisoning bacteria.

    In general, food should be cooked to a temperature of at least 75 °C or hotter. When food is cooked, it should be eaten promptly, kept hotter than 60 °C, or cooled, covered and stored in the fridge or freezer.

    Watch this video about cooking food safely.

    People at risk from food poisoning

    Some people are more at risk from food poisoning than others. Vulnerable groups include:

    pregnant women young children the elderly

    anyone with a chronic illness.

    Special care should be taken when preparing, cooking, serving and storing food for these groups.

    Safety when cooking high-risk foods

    Food poisoning bacteria grow more easily on some foods than others. High-risk foods include:

    raw and cooked meat - such as chicken and minced meat, and foods containing them, such as casseroles, curries and lasagne

    dairy products - such as custard and dairy based desserts like custard tarts and cheesecake

    eggs and egg products - such as mousse

    small goods - such as ham and salami

    seafood - such as seafood salad, patties, fish balls, stews containing seafood and fish stock

    cooked rice and pasta

    prepared salads - such as coleslaws, pasta salads and rice salads

    prepared fruit salads

    ready-to-eat foods - such as sandwiches, rolls, and pizza that contain any of the food above.

    High-risk foods and the temperature danger zone

    Take care with high-risk foods. You should remember to:

    Keep high-risk foods out of the temperature danger zone of between 5 °C and 60 °C.

    If high-risk foods have been left in the temperature danger zone for up to 2 hours the food should be reheated, refrigerated or consumed.

    If high-risk foods have been left in the temperature danger zone for longer than 2 hours, but less than 4 hours, they should be consumed immediately.

    Throw out any high-risk foods that have been left in the temperature danger zone for more than 4 hours.

    Cook all food to a temperature of 75 °C

    How you cook food is very important. Different foods need a different approach:

    Aim for an internal temperature of 75 °C or hotter when you cook food. Heating foods to this temperature kills most food poisoning bacteria. Use a thermometer to check the internal temperature of foods during the cooking process.

    Cook mince, sausages, whole chickens or stuffed meats right through to the centre. You should not be able to see any pink meat and the juices should be clear.

    Cook steak, chops and whole cuts of red meat to your preference as food poisoning bacteria are mostly on the surface.

    Cook fish until it flakes easily with a fork.

    Cook foods made from eggs such as omelettes and baked egg custards thoroughly.

    Food safety with raw eggs

    Take extra care when preparing foods that contain raw egg, such as homemade mayonnaise, sauces, such as hollandaise, and desserts, such as tiramisu and mousse. Bacteria present on eggshells and inside the egg can contaminate these types of food and cause food poisoning.

    Avoid giving food containing raw eggs to pregnant women, young children, elderly people and anyone with a chronic illness.

    Food safety and microwave cooking

    Microwaves are a quick and convenient way to cook food. However, if they are not used correctly, they can cook food unevenly. This may leave food partially cooked or not reaching a uniform temperature of 75 °C. When you cook food in the microwave:

    Cut food into evenly sized pieces if possible or put larger or thicker items towards the outside edge of the dish.

    Cover the food with a microwave-safe lid or microwave plastic wrap. This will trap the steam and promote more even cooking.

    Rotate and stir food during cooking.

    Wait until the standing time is over before you check that the cooking is complete. Food continues to cook even after the microwave is turned off.

    Cooling and storing food

    If you need to store food for later use, wait until the steam stops rising, cover the food and put it in the fridge. This helps keep the food out of the temperature danger zone as fast as possible. Large portions of food cool faster when you put them into shallow trays or divide them into smaller portions.

    Source : www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au

    Serve safe Flashcards

    Start studying Serve safe. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Serve safe

    Contaminants are divided into three categories

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    biological, chemical, physical

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    fungi:

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    -Include molds and yeasts

    -Commonly spoil food, but only occasionally cause foodborne illness

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    1/130 Created by leslyortiz5502

    Terms in this set (130)

    Contaminants are divided into three categories

    biological, chemical, physical

    fungi:

    -Include molds and yeasts

    -Commonly spoil food, but only occasionally cause foodborne illness

    parasites:

    Require a living host (human or animal) to grow and reproduce.

    viruses:

    -Need a living host (human, animal) to grow. Will not grow in food but can be transferred by food.

    -Cannot be destroyed by normal cooking temperatures.

    -Can be carried in contaminated water.

    -Norovirus is the most common foodborne illness.

    -Hepatitis A can cause jaundice (yellowing of whites of eyes and skin due to liver damage).

    -You are required to keep Shellshock Tags (documents indicating when and where shellfish was harvested) for 90 days after selling the shellfish. This is because it can take weeks for Hepatitis A to develop. Shellshock Tags allow for tracing illness back to its source.

    Backflow:

    Reverse flow of contaminants through a cross-connection into the drinkable water supply.

    Ensuring guests are notified

    -Consumer advisories for raw or partially cooked food

    -Use of clean tableware in a self-service areas

    Ensuring TCS food is cooked and cooled correctly

    -Cooked to required temperatures

    -Temperatures are checked with calibrated thermometers

    -Food is cooled rapidly

    Foodservice managers/PICs should

    -Regularly offer food safety training to staff

    -Discuss food safety expectations

    -Document and maintain food-handling procedures

    -Consider awards and rewards for good safety records

    -Set a good example

    The person in charge (PIC) of a foodservice operation is responsible for:

    -Making sure food handlers regularly monitor food temperatures during hot and cold holding.

    -Ensuring food is not prepared in a private home or where people are living or sleeping.

    -Restricting people other than food handlers from prep, storage, and dishwashing areas.

    -Maintenance and delivery workers following food safety practices.

    -Monitoring staff handwashing

    The person in charge (PIC) of a foodservice operation is responsible for ensuring food safety standards are met,

    -Demonstrating they and their staff are trained in food safety

    -Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    -Controlling time and temperature

    -Preventing cross-contamination

    - personal hygiene

    -Cleaning and sanitizing

    Two types of food that are most likely to become unsafe

    -TCS food -Ready-to-eat food AIR GAP

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)

    is a way of looking at a process to identify specific points where hazards can be prevented, eliminated, or reduced to safe levels.

    The seven HACCP principles are

    -Conduct a hazard analysis.

    -Determine critical control points (CCPs).

    -Establish critical limits.

    -Establish monitoring procedures.

    -Identify corrective actions.

    -Verify that the system works.

    -Establish procedures for record-keeping and documentation.

    When food handlers are sick,

    Restrict them from working with exposed food, utensils, and equipment.

    Avoid time-temperature abuse

    -Monitor time and temperature.

    -Make sure the correct kinds of thermometers are available.

    -Regularly record temperatures and the times they are taken.

    -Minimize the time that food spends in the temperature danger zone.

    -Take corrective actions if time-temperature standards are not met.

    Thermometers used to measure the temperature of food must be accurate to

    +/- 2 F

    Exclude them from coming into the operation. This is especially important if they have these symptoms:

    Vomiting Diarrhea

    Jaundice (a yellowing of the skin or eyes)

    Sore throat with fever

    Infected wound or boil that is open or draining (unless properly covered)

    41° F - 135° F

    Temperature "danger zone" - pathogens grow

    70° F - 125° F Super danger zone ABOVE 135° F

    Holding and receiving hot TCS foodHot TCS food in vending machines

    BELOW 41° F

    holding and receiving cold TCS foodLive shellfish (once received)Shucked shellfish (once received)Milk and dairy productions (once received)UHT and Aseptically packaged food (once opened)Fresh produceROP foodPooled eggsCold TCS foodCold TCS food in vending machines

    45° F

    Air Temperature of live shellfish (when receiving)Shucked shellfish (when receiving)Milk and fresh dairy products (when receiving)Air temperature of shell eggs

    <50° F

    Internal temperature for live shellfish (when receiving)(cool to 41o F in 4 hours)

    70° F

    Temperature of running water for thawing

    135° F - 70° F

    Source : quizlet.com

    At which event must special care be taken when preparing food for the guests servsafe – Let’s Grab All Answers.

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    MARCH 29, 2022 BY HAKAN

    At which event must special care be taken when preparing food for the guests servsafe

    At which event must special care be taken when preparing food for the guests servsafe

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