if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    as an electron in an atom moves from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get as an electron in an atom moves from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom from EN Bilgi.

    When an electron in an atom goes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom ____.

    Answer to: When an electron in an atom goes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom ____.

    Math

    When an electron in an atom goes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom ____.

    When an electron in an atom goes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom ____. Question:

    When an electron in an atom goes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom _____.

    Electronic Transition:

    Any substance is made up of electrons, protons and neutrons. According to atomic models, protons and neutrons are present at the centre of the atom known as the nucleus whereas the electrons are revolving around the nucleus. When an electron jumps from one orbit to the other it is known as electronic transition. The hydrogen is one of the fundamental atoms in the entire periodic table. Its atomic number is '1'. Generally, there is only one electron in the hydrogen atom. The energy of the electron of the hydrogen atom can be calculated with the help of the formula given by Bohr. There are several units to express energy such as joules, calories. In addition, the energy of the electron in any orbit is expressed in electron volts (eV).

    E = − 13.6 n 2 e V E=−13.6n2 eV

    Answer and Explanation:

    Become a Study.com member to unlock this answer! Create your account

    View this answer

    When an electron in an atom goes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, the atom releases energy.

    In an atom, there are several...

    See full answer below.

    Become a member and unlock all Study Answers

    Start today. Try it now

    Create an account

    Ask a question

    Our experts can answer your tough homework and study questions.

    Ask a question

    Search Answers

    Learn more about this topic:

    What is an Energy Level of an Atom? - Definition & Equation

    from

    Chapter 28 / Lesson 16

    91K

    Learn about the energy levels of an atom. Find out what an electron energy level is, discover how to find energy levels, and study examples of energy levels.

    Related to this Question

    Related Answers Related Lessons Related Courses

    According to the bohr model of the atom, which...

    Determine whether each of the following...

    How many decibels correspond to the lowest...

    Ionization energy is the energy required to...

    Explore our homework questions and answers library

    Browse by subject

    Source : study.com

    What happens when an electron moves from a lower energy state to a higher energy state?

    Answer: It depends how it happens. The energy needs to go some place. Sometimes the atom emits a photon in what is called spontaneous emission. But for most molecules most of the energy is absorbed by the nuclei and make them rotate or vibrate faster through internal conversion. This is why it no...

    What happens when an electron moves from a lower energy state to a higher energy state?

    Ad by Huawei

    How does AR Engine facilitate the development of AR apps?

    Artificial reality (AR) has been widely deployed in many fields, such as marketing, education, and gaming fields, as well as in exhibition halls. 2D image and 3D object tracking t(Continue reading)

    Sort David Kahana

    physicist unhingedAuthor has 7.8K answers and 15.8M answer views4y

    Related

    Why can't an electron jump down from its ground state to a lower energy state?

    An electron can’t jump down from its ground state, because there is no lower energy state. That’s what ground state means. It’s basically a question of definition.

    If there is no lowest energy state you will have an instability in your theory of electrons. Such a theory will generally be internally inconsistent. It is a sure sign that there must be other physics when you have an inconsistency in your theory.

    Possibly you are thinking of the Dirac equation which famously has negative energy solutions. Dirac solved this problem by proposing that all the negative energy states were already filled w

    Pablo Sampedro Ruiz

    PhD in Chemistry & Physical Chemistry, Nanyang Technological University (Graduated 2020)Author has 940 answers and 537.3K answer views1y

    It depends how it happens. The energy needs to go some place. Sometimes the atom emits a photon in what is called spontaneous emission. But for most molecules most of the energy is absorbed by the nuclei and make them rotate or vibrate faster through internal conversion. This is why it not common for a molecule to be fluorescent. If the high energy level is very high level and low very low, it is possible for the atom to ionize and release an electron with all that energy.

    665 views Jess H. Brewer

    Physics professor since 1977.Author has 22.9K answers and 44.3M answer views3y

    Related

    How is it possible for an electron to stay at a higher state of energy for so long without giving off its energy (forbidden state)?

    It is not the state that is forbidden, it is the transition to a lower state. Usually this is because the destination state has the “wrong” angular momentum (or some other conserved quantity) compared with the metastable state. Transitions involving photon emission generally involve a change of angular momentum by one unit (

    ℏ ℏ

    ), so such transitions between two states with the same angular momentum are usually forbidden.

    Sponsored by USAFIS

    This is the best time to apply for the Green Card DV Lottery!

    Get a chance to win and apply today! America is waiting for you with many amazing opportunities.

    Suresh Verma

    M.Sc.(Physics) in Physics, Patna Science College, Patna (Graduated 1965)Author has 1.9K answers and 3.4M answer views4y

    Related

    What time is taken by an electron to move from a higher energy state to the lower energy state during the emission spectrum?

    one can make an assessment of time by using Heisenberg’s uncertainty relation.

    delta( E) . delta ( time) = h ( the Planck’s constant)

    so the transition time = of the order of h / delta(E)

    the emission line is say of the order 10 eV and h is 4.1 .10^-15 eV

    so the time = 10^-16 seconds.

    the atomic levels have this order of time- lifetime of an event.

    Deb P. Choudhury

    Studied Mathematics (Graduated 1978)Author has 7.7K answers and 4.1M answer views3y

    Related

    In the change in the shape of an electron when does it goes to the higher energy state from lower energy state?

    Quantum mechanics teaches us that the particles at the atomic scale do not have definite shape, which means that we cannot determine their shapes.

    Braden Kaness

    Mixed Martial Arts nerd and Physics EnthusiastAuthor has 297 answers and 309.9K answer views1y

    Related

    What happens when an electron moves to a lower energy level?

    It emits a photon!

    What a great question. The electron loses energy as it drops levels. Because nothing can ever be created or destroyed, that energy doesn’t just disappear. It is released as an electromagnetic force carrier, AKA the photon.

    Each element has a (or multiple) very specific wavelength photon(s) it emits when the electrons transition between energy levels. In fact, it’s so reliable, we use this as an atomic ‘finger print’ to tell what kind of elements we have in certain substances. This entire field of science is known as Spectroscopy.

    Raj Bhuva

    BSE, BA in Chemical Engineering & Chemistry (college major), University of Pennsylvania6y

    Related

    What happens when we supply more energy to an electron than that required for transition from one state to the other?

    Let's simplify this through the following analogy:

    Say that you're at the bottom of a flight of stairs. You can climb up only one step at a time (let's assume that you don't skip steps). Now for you to climb up 1 step, I need to give you 2 bars of chocolate. For you to climb up 2 steps, I need to give you a total of 4 bars of chocolate and so on...

    Suppose I give you 2 bars of chocolate - you will climb up one step. Next I give you 4 bars of chocolate - you will climb up 2 steps (from the base). However, let's say that I give you 2.5 bars of chocolate - now what will you do? Sure you have the 2

    Sponsored by Dlubal Software

    Source : www.quora.com

    BIOdotEDU

    Energy and Electrons

    When an electron is hit by a photon of light, it absorbs the quanta of energy the photon was carrying and moves to a higher energy state.

    One way of thinking about this higher energy state is to imagine that the electron is now moving faster, (it has just been "hit" by a rapidly moving photon). But if the velocity of the electron is now greater, it's wavelength must also have changed, so it can no long stay in the original orbital where the original wavelength was perfect for that orbital-shape.

    So the electron moves to a different orbital where once again its own wavelength is in phase with its self.

    Electrons therefore have to jump around within the atom as they either gain or lose energy. This property of electrons, and the energy they absorb or give off, can be put to an every day use.

    Almost any electronic device you buy these days comes with one or more Light Emitting Diodes (usually called "LEDs"). These are tiny bubbles of epoxy or plastic with two wire connectors. When electricity is passed through the diode it glows with a characteristic color telling you that the device is working, switched on and ready to do it's work.

    Deep in the semiconductor materials of the LED are "impurities", materials such as aluminum, gallium, indium and phosphide. When properly stimulated, electrons in these materials move from a lower level of energy up to a higher level of energy and occupy a different orbital.

    Then, at some point, these higher energy electrons give up their "extra" energy in the form of a photon of light, and fall back down to their original energy level. The light that has suddenly been produced rushes away from the electron, atom and the LED to color our world.

    Typically, the light produced by a LED is only one color (red or green being strong favorites). Although they are cheap, easy to make, don't cost a lot to run, LEDs are not usually used to light a room, because they cannot normally produce the wide range of different colors needed in "white" light.

    This is because of the quantum nature of the atoms being used in the LED and the quantum energies of the electrons within them.

    When an excited electron within a LED gives up energy it must do so in those lumps called quanta. These are fixed packets of energy that cannot be changed or used in fractions; they must always be transferred in whole amounts.

    Thus, an excited electron has no option but to give off either 1 quanta or 2 quanta of energy, it cannot give up 1.5 quanta, or 2.3 quanta. Also, the electron can only move to very limited orbitals within the atom; it must end up in an orbital where the wavelength is now uses is "in phase" with itself. These two restrictions limit the quality of the quanta of energy being released by the electron, and thus the nature of the photon of light that rushes away from the LED.

    Since the energy given off is strongly restricted to quanta, and quanta that allow the electron to move to a suitable place within the atom, the photons of light are similarly restricted to a tiny range of values of wavelength and frequency (a property we see as "color").

    Many LEDs have electrons that can only give up quanta of energy that, when converted into photons, produce light with a wavelength of about 700 nm - which we then see as red light. These electrons are so restricted in the quanta they can emit that they never shine blue light, or green light, or yellow light, only red light.

    Lines in Spectra

    Long, long before their were LEDs in our lives, scientists trying to understand electrons in atoms noted a similar phenomenon when light was either shone on certain materials or given off by certain materials.

    In 1859 the German physicist Gustav Robert Kirchoff, and his older friend Robert Wilhelm Bunsen came up with a clever idea. They used Bunsen's burner to strongly heat tiny pieces of various materials and minerals until they were so hot that they glowed and gave off light.

    Sodium, for example, when heated to incandescence, produced a strong yellow light, but no blue, green or red. Potassium glowed with a dim sort of violet light, and mercury with a horrible green light but no red or yellow.

    When Kirchoff passed the emitted light through a prism it separated out into its various wavelengths (the same way a rainbow effect is produced when white light is used), and he got a shock. He could only see a few thin lines of light in very specific places and often spread far apart.

    Clearly glowing sodium was not producing anywhere near all the different wavelengths of white light, in fact it was only producing a very characteristic band of light in the yellow region of the spectrum - just like a LED!

    Source : www.brooklyn.cuny.edu

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 17 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer