if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    approximately how long does the menstrual cycle last if fertilization does not take place?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get approximately how long does the menstrual cycle last if fertilization does not take place? from EN Bilgi.

    Menstrual Cycle: An Overview

    A woman is generally most fertile (able to become pregnant) a few days before, during, and after ovulation.

    Menstrual Cycle: An Overview

    CONTACT US

    ADOLESCENT MEDICINE

    4 LOCATIONS Contact Us 215-590-3537

    Adolescence can be a confusing time for young people as their bodies begin to change and they become young adults. Ovulation and menstruation are normal parts of puberty, and by better understanding what is typical, you or your child can know when to seek help for any abnormal menstrual conditions. See common menstrual complaints.

    Ovulation

    When a young person reaches puberty, they begin to ovulate — a process in which a mature egg cell (also called an ovum) that is ready for fertilization by a sperm cell is released from one of the ovaries (two reproductive organs located in the pelvis).

    If the egg is fertilized by a sperm cell as it travels down the fallopian tube, pregnancy occurs. The fertilized egg then becomes attached to the lining of the uterus until the placenta (an organ, shaped like a flat cake, that only grows during pregnancy and provides a metabolic interchange between the fetus and pregnant person) develops.

    If the egg does not become fertilized as it travels down the fallopian tube on its way to the uterus, the endometrium (lining of the uterus) is shed and passes through the vagina (the passageway through which fluid passes out of the body during menstrual periods, also called the birth canal), a process called menstruation.

    As the average menstrual cycle in adults lasts 28 days (starting with the first day of one period and ending with the first day of the next menstrual period), most people ovulate on day 14. At this time, some people experience pain or discomfort in their lower abdomen, spotting, or bleeding, while others do not experience any symptoms at all.

    A person is generally most fertile (able to become pregnant) a few days before, during, and after ovulation.

    Menstruation

    Menstruation is one part of a person's menstrual cycle which includes the shedding of the endometrium (lining of the uterus) that occurs throughout a person's reproductive life.

    With each monthly menstrual cycle, the endometrium prepares itself to nourish a fetus, as increased levels of estrogen and progesterone help to thicken its walls. If fertilization does not occur, the endometrium, coupled with blood and mucus from the vagina and cervix (the lower, narrow part of the uterus located between the bladder and the rectum) make up the menstrual flow (also called menses) that leaves the body through the vagina.

    When does menstruation begin?

    On average, menarche (a young person's first menstrual period) occurs between the ages of 12 and 13 years old. It generally happens about two years after a girl’s breast budding (average age 10 to 12 years old), and, in most cases, not long after the onset of pubic and underarm hair. Stress, including medical illness, various types of strenuous exercise, weight loss and diet can affect the onset of menstruation and the regularity of the menstrual cycle.

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that a young person consult her healthcare provider if she has not started to menstruate by age 15, and/or if she has not begun to develop breast buds, pubic hair, or underarm hair by the age of 13.

    How long is a menstrual cycle?

    The average menstrual cycle lasts 28 days — from the beginning of one period until the next begins — though in adolescents, cycles can range from 21 to 45 days in duration.

    For up to the first five years after a girl begins menstruating, periods may be irregular in length and intensity. Normal menstrual periods can last up to seven days, but blood flow during that time may vary from heavy to light and will differ from individual to individual.

    If a young person’s menstrual cycle is especially heavy, irregular, absent or is accompanied by painful cramps, vaginal itching or other symptoms, they should be examined by a clinician who specializes in treating adolescents, like the Adolescent Medicine Specialty Clinic at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The Adolescent Medicine Specialty Clinic provides evaluation, treatment and support for young people with gynecologic needs.

    Learn about common menstrual complaints and how to treat them.

    Reviewed by Kenisha Campbell, MD, MPH

    NEXT STEPS

    CONTACT US ADOLESCENT MEDICINE 4 LOCATIONS Contact Us 215-590-3537

    Source : www.chop.edu

    Menstrual Cycle

    Menstrual Cycle and Women's Health Issues - Learn about from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version.

    HEALTHY LIVING

    Menstrual Cycle

    By

    Jessica E. McLaughlin

    , MD, Medical University of South Carolina

    Last full review/revision Apr 2022| Content last modified Apr 2022

    CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION

    GET THE QUICK FACTS Follicular phase Ovulatory phase Luteal phase

    Menstruation is the shedding of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) accompanied by bleeding. It occurs in approximately monthly cycles throughout a woman's reproductive life, except during pregnancy. Menstruation starts during puberty (at menarche) and stops permanently at menopause. (Menopause is defined as 1 year after the last menstrual cycle.)

    By definition, the menstrual cycle begins with the first day of bleeding, which is counted as day 1. The cycle ends just before the next menstrual period. Menstrual cycles normally range from about 24 to 38 days. Only 10 to 15% of women have cycles that are exactly 28 days. Also, in at least 20% of women, cycles are irregular. That is, they are longer or shorter than the normal range. Usually, the cycles vary the most and the intervals between periods are longest in the years immediately after menstruation starts (menarche) and before menopause.

    Normally, menstrual bleeding lasts 4 to 8 days. Blood loss during a cycle usually ranges from 1/5 to 2 1/2 ounces. A sanitary pad or tampon, depending on the type, can hold up to an ounce of blood. Menstrual blood, unlike blood resulting from an injury, usually does not clot unless the bleeding is very heavy.

    The menstrual cycle is regulated by hormones. Luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, which are produced by the pituitary gland, promote ovulation and stimulate the ovaries to produce estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen and progesterone stimulate the uterus and breasts to prepare for possible fertilization.

    The Pituitary and Hypothalamus

    VIDEO

    The Testes and Ovaries

    VIDEO

    The menstrual cycle has three phases:

    Follicular (before release of the egg)

    Ovulatory (egg release)

    Luteal (after egg release)

    Changes During the Menstrual Cycle

    The menstrual cycle is regulated by the complex interaction of hormones: luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone.

    The menstrual cycle has three phases:

    Follicular (before release of the egg)

    Ovulatory (egg release)

    Luteal (after egg release)

    The menstrual cycle begins with menstrual bleeding (menstruation), which marks the first day of the follicular phase.

    When the follicular phase begins, levels of estrogen and progesterone are low. As a result, the top layers of the thickened lining of the uterus (endometrium) break down and are shed, and menstrual bleeding occurs. About this time, the follicle-stimulating hormone level increases slightly, stimulating the development of several follicles in the ovaries. (Follicles are sacs filled with fluid.) Each follicle contains an egg. Later in this phase, as the follicle-stimulating hormone level decreases, usually only one follicle continues to develop. This follicle produces estrogen. Estrogen levels increase steadily.

    The ovulatory phase begins with a surge in luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels. Luteinizing hormone stimulates egg release (ovulation), which usually occurs 16 to 32 hours after the surge begins. The estrogen level decreases during the surge, and the progesterone level starts to increase.

    During the luteal phase, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels decrease. The ruptured follicle closes after releasing the egg and forms a corpus luteum, which produces progesterone. During most of this phase, the estrogen level is high. Progesterone and estrogen cause the lining of the uterus to thicken more, to prepare for possible fertilization.

    If the egg is not fertilized, the corpus luteum degenerates and no longer produces progesterone, the estrogen level decreases, the top layers of the lining break down and are shed, and menstrual bleeding occurs (the start of a new menstrual cycle).

    If the egg is fertilized, the corpus luteum continues to function during early pregnancy. It helps maintain the pregnancy.

    Follicular phase

    The follicular phase begins on the first day of menstrual bleeding (day 1). But the main event in this phase is the development of follicles in the ovaries. (Follicles are sacs filled with fluid.)

    At the beginning of the follicular phase, the lining of the uterus (endometrium) is thick with fluids and nutrients designed to nourish an embryo. If no egg has been fertilized, estrogen and progesterone levels are low. As a result, the top layers of the endometrium are shed, and menstrual bleeding occurs.

    About this time, the pituitary gland slightly increases its production of follicle-stimulating hormone. This hormone then stimulates the growth of 3 to 30 follicles. Each follicle contains an egg. Later in the phase, as the level of this hormone decreases, only one of these follicles (called the dominant follicle) continues to grow. It soon begins to produce estrogen, and the other stimulated follicles begin to break down. The increasing estrogen also begins to prepare the uterus and stimulates the luteinizing hormone surge.

    Source : www.msdmanuals.com

    Menstrual Cycle: An Overview

    A woman is generally most fertile (able to become pregnant) a few days before, during, and after ovulation.

    Health

    Menstrual Cycle: An Overview

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Share on Pinterest Share via Email

    What is ovulation?

    When a young woman reaches puberty, she starts to ovulate. This is when a mature egg or ovum is released from one of the ovaries. The ovaries are the two female reproductive organs found in the pelvis. If the egg is fertilized by a sperm as it travels down the fallopian tube, then pregnancy occurs. The fertilized egg attaches to the lining of the uterus. The placenta then develops. The placenta transfers nutrition and oxygen to the fetus from mother. If the egg does not become fertilized, the lining of the uterus (endometrium) is shed during menstruation.

    The average menstrual cycle lasts 28 days. The cycle starts with the first day of one period and ends with the first day of the next period. The average woman ovulates on day 14. At this time, some women have minor discomfort in their lower abdomen, spotting, or bleeding, while others do not have any symptoms at all.

    A woman is generally most likely to get pregnant (fertile) if she has sex a few days before, and during ovulation.

     What is menstruation?

    Menstruation is one part of a woman's cycle when the lining of the uterus (endometrium) is shed. This occurs throughout a woman's reproductive life. With each monthly cycle, the endometrium prepares itself to nourish a fetus. Increased levels of estrogen and progesterone help thicken its walls. If fertilization does not occur, the endometrium, along with blood and mucus from the vagina and cervix make up the menstrual flow that leaves the body through the vagina during the period.

    When does menstruation start?

    On average, a young woman in the U.S. has her first menstrual period at about age 12. This is generally 2 to 3 years after her breasts start to grow. This is also soon after she notices pubic and underarm hair. Stress, strenuous exercise, and diet can affect when a girl first has her period.

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that a young woman consult her healthcare provider if she has not started to menstruate by the age of 15, or if she has not begun to develop breast buds, pubic hair, or underarm hair by the age of 13.

    How long is a menstrual cycle?

    For menstruating women, an average menstrual cycle lasts 28 days. It starts with the first day of the last period and ends with the first day of the next menstrual period. However, the length of women's cycles varies, particularly for the first year or 2 after a young woman has her first period. Women may have cycles as short as 21 days, or as long as 45 days during the first few years. However, anything outside of this range may require medical attention.

    Request an Appointment

    Find a Doctor

    Related

    FEMALE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Normal Breast Development and Changes

    GYNECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

    7 Things You Should Always Discuss with Your Gynecologist

    Contraception / Birth Control

    Related Topics

    Source : www.hopkinsmedicine.org

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 5 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer