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    answer the following question in the box labeled “short answer #2” on page 6 of your answer document. in the excerpt from the namesake, what is gogol’s primary conflict? explain your answer and support it with evidence from the selection.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get answer the following question in the box labeled “short answer #2” on page 6 of your answer document. in the excerpt from the namesake, what is gogol’s primary conflict? explain your answer and support it with evidence from the selection. from EN Bilgi.

    [PDF] 2016 texas staar test – end of course – english i

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    2016 texas staar test – end of course – english i

    June 24, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Arts & Humanities, English, Literature

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    2016 TEXAS STAAR TEST – END OF COURSE – ENGLISH I Total Possible Score: 92 Needed Correct to Pass: For 2016 - 48 For 2017 - 50 Advanced Performance: 74 Time Limit: 5 Hours This file contains the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) administered in Spring, 2016, along with the answer key, learning objectives, and, for writing tests, the scoring guide. This document is available to the public under Texas state law. This file was created from information released by the Texas Education Agency, which is the state agency that develops and administers the tests. All of this information appears on the Texas Education Agency web site, but has been compiled here into one package for each grade and subject, rather than having to download pieces from various web pages. The number of correct answers required to "pass" this test is shown above. Because of where the "passing" score is set, it may be possible to pass the test without learning some important areas of study. Because of this, I believe that making the passing grade should not be considered "good enough." A student's goal should be to master each of the objectives covered by the test. The "Advanced Performance" score is a good goal for mastery of all the objectives. The test in this file may differ somewhat in appearance from the printed version, due to formatting limitations. Since STAAR questions are changed each year, some proposed questions for future tests are included in each year's exams in order to evaluate the questions. Questions being evaluated for future tests do not count toward a student's score. Those questions are also not included in the version of the test made available to the public until after they used as part of the official test. The test materials in this file are copyright 2016, Texas Education Agency. All rights reserved. Reproduction of all or portions of this work is prohibited without express written permission from the Texas Education Agency. Residents of the state of Texas may reproduce and use copies of the materials and related materials for individual personal use only without obtaining written permission of the Texas Education Agency. For full copyright information, see: http://tea.texas.gov/About_TEA/Welcome_and_Overview/Site_Policies/ Questions and comments about the tests should be directed to: Texas Education Agency Student Assessment Division 1701 N. Congress Ave, Room 3-122A Austin, Texas 78701 phone: 512-463-9536 email: [email protected] Hard copies of the released tests (including Braille) may be ordered online through Pearson Education at http://www.texasassessment.com/released-tests/ or by calling 855-333-7770. When printing released questions for mathematics, make sure the Print Menu is set to print the pages at 100% to ensure that the art reflects the intended measurements. For comments and questions about this file or the web site, you can e-mail me at [email protected] Please direct any questions about the content of the test to the Texas Education Agency at the address above. To download additional tests, go to www.scotthochberg.com. Provided as a public service by Former State Representative Scott Hochberg. No tax dollars were used for this posting.

    STAAR ®

    State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness

    English I

    Administered March 2016

    RELEASED Copyright © 2016, Texas Education Agency. All rights reserved. Reproduction of all or portions of this work is prohibited without express written permission from the Texas Education Agency.

    WRITING Page 3

    Read the selection and choose the best answer to each question. Then fill in the answer on your answer document. Alicia wrote the following paper in response to a class assignment. Before she submits it to her teacher, she would like you to read it and look for any revisions she should make. Then answer the questions that follow.

    Body Language (1) The expressions you make and the way you hold your body can say a great deal about your state of mind. (2) People have studied these nonverbal cues for centuries, even as far back as the times of the ancient Greeks and Romans. (3) You’ve probably heard that others might draw conclusions about you by observing your body language. (4) But you may not realize that evidence suggests that body language also works in reverse. (5) In 1988, researchers did a study in which they positioned participants’ facial expressions by having them hold a pencil in their mouth. (6) Some people were asked to hold the pencil horizontally in their teeth, which shaped their mouth into something like a smile. (7) Then the participants were shown a series of cartoons and asked to assess how funny they were. (8) Interestingly, the people who were already “smiling” thought the cartoons were funnier than the people who were “frowning” did. (9) This type of study has been repeated on other occasions with similar results. (10) It appears that simply holding your facial muscles in a particular expression sends messages to your brain that can make your feelings reflect your expression. (11) Evidence also suggests that the way you hold the rest of your body can affect how you feel. (12) Amy Cuddy did a study on how “power poses” affect people. (13) She is a social psychologist at Harvard University. (14) A power pose is a way of holding your body that suggests you’re in control of a situation. (15) It’s positioning your body in a way that says you have control. (16) Imagine a top executive at a major company leaning back in his chair with his hands behind his head and his feet on the desk. (17) That’s a power pose. (18) So is standing tall with your feet slightly apart, your chest out, and your hands on your hips. (19) Cuddy measured people’s hormones after just two minutes of holding poses like these and opposed the results with the hormone levels of people who were slouched

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