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    after the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, african americans continued to experience political and economic oppression mainly because

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    Reconstruction and Its Aftermath

    After the Civil War, African Americans were allowed to vote, actively participate in politics, acquire land, seek employment, and use public accommodations. Opponents soon began to find means for eroding these gains.

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    The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship

    Reconstruction and Its Aftermath

    Home | Exhibition Overview | Exhibition Items | Learn More | Public Programs | Acknowledgments

    Sections: Slavery—The Peculiar Institution | Free Blacks in the Antebellum Period | Abolition, Anti-Slavery Movements, and the Rise of the Sectional Controversy | The Civil War | Reconstruction and Its Aftermath | The Booker T. Washington Era | World War I and Postwar Society | The Depression, The New Deal, and World War II | The Civil Rights Era

    The Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 freed African Americans in rebel states, and after the Civil War, the Thirteenth Amendment emancipated all U.S. slaves wherever they were. As a result, the mass of Southern blacks now faced the difficulty Northern blacks had confronted—that of a free people surrounded by many hostile whites. One freedman, Houston Hartsfield Holloway, wrote, “For we colored people did not know how to be free and the white people did not know how to have a free colored person about them.”

    Even after the Emancipation Proclamation, two more years of war, service by African American troops, and the defeat of the Confederacy, the nation was still unprepared to deal with the question of full citizenship for its newly freed black population. The Reconstruction implemented by Congress, which lasted from 1866 to 1877, was aimed at reorganizing the Southern states after the Civil War, providing the means for readmitting them into the Union, and defining the means by which whites and blacks could live together in a nonslave society. The South, however, saw Reconstruction as a humiliating, even vengeful imposition and did not welcome it.

    During the years after the war, black and white teachers from the North and South, missionary organizations, churches and schools worked tirelessly to give the emancipated population the opportunity to learn. Former slaves of every age took advantage of the opportunity to become literate. Grandfathers and their grandchildren sat together in classrooms seeking to obtain the tools of freedom.

    After the Civil War, with the protection of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution and the Civil Rights Act of 1866, African Americans enjoyed a period when they were allowed to vote, actively participate in the political process, acquire the land of former owners, seek their own employment, and use public accommodations. Opponents of this progress, however, soon rallied against the former slaves' freedom and began to find means for eroding the gains for which many had shed their blood.

    Forever Free

    Celebration of Emancipation

    Thomas Nast's depiction of emancipation at the end of the Civil War envisions the future of free blacks in the U.S. and contrasts it with various cruelties of the institution of slavery.

    Thomas Nast. Emancipation. Philadelphia: S. Bott, 1865. Wood engraving. Prints & Photographs Division Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-2573 (5–9)

    Bookmark this item: //www.loc.gov/exhibits/african-american-odyssey/reconstruction.html#obj1

    Victorious Soldiers Return

    Alfred Waud's drawing captures the exuberance of the Little Rock, Arkansas, African American community as the U. S. Colored Troops returned home at the end of the Civil War. The victorious soldiers are joyously greeted by women and children.

    Alfred R. Waud. Mustered Out. Little Rock, Arkansas, April 20, 1865. Drawing. Chinese white on green paper. Published in Harper's Weekly, May 19, 1866. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-175 (5–1)

    Bookmark this item: //www.loc.gov/exhibits/african-american-odyssey/reconstruction.html#obj2

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    Black Exodus

    Black Exodus to Kansas

    During Reconstruction freed slaves began to leave the South. One such group, originally from Kentucky, established the community of Nicodemus in 1877 in Graham County on the high, arid plains of northwestern Kansas. However, because of several crop failures and resentment from the county's white settlers, all but a few homesteaders abandoned their claims. A rising population of 500 in 1880 had declined to less than 200 by 1910.

    A page of photographs and a township map from a 1906 county land ownership atlas provide evidence that some of these black migrants still owned land in and around this small village. Their impressive determination in an area with few good natural resou rces has resulted in the only surviving all-black community in Kansas.

    Source : www.loc.gov

    Summit Learning

    Summit Learning

    Focus Area Library Reconstruction

    Objectives

    Introduction

    Resources

    Presentation: Reconstruction

    Objective 1

    Define Reconstruction and identify the Radical Republicans, Andrew Johnson, and the Black Codes.

    Questions

    Resources

    Video and Presentation: Four Plans of Reconstruction (9:59)

    The same power point as above, but narrated if you want to listen and read!

    Reading: Reconstruction

    Reading: Radical Reconstruction

    Check for Understanding

    Objective 2

    Explain the rights and restrictions on African Americans including the Freedmen's Bureau and the Jim Crow Laws and the resulting movement of former slaves to the cities.

    Questions

    Resources

    Video: Crash Course Reconstruction

    Reading: Jim Crow Laws

    Reading: Freedman's Bureau

    Timeline: Reconstruction and Jim Crow

    Check for Understanding

    Objective 3

    Identify and describe the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.

    Questions

    Resources

    Reading & Graphic: 13th Amendment

    Reading & Graphic: 14th Amendment

    Reading & Graphic: 15th Amendment

    Check for Understanding

    Objective 4

    Describe the rise of the Ku Klux Klan and the effects of the Klan.

    Questions

    Resources

    Reading: Grant, Reconstruction, and the Klu Klux Klan

    Reading: The Force Acts

    Reading: Personal Account of Encounters with the KKK

    Klansville, USA (Total run time 7:32, history of the KKK starts at 4:59)

    Source: American Experience

    Focus Area Details

    Description

    By the time you finish this playlist, you should be able to: 1.Define Reconstruction and identify the Radical Republicans, Andrew Johnson, and Black Codes. 2.Explain rights and restrictions on African Americans. 3.Identify and describe the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments to the Constitution. 3.Describe the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.

    Score Needed to Pass

    8 out of 10 correct.

    Key Terms

    1.Reconstruction 2.Radical Republicans 3.Andrew Johnson 4.Black Codes 5.Freedman’s Bureau 6.Jim Crow Laws 7.Racial Segregation 8.Poll Taxes 9.Literacy Test 10.Ku Klux Klan 11.Share Cropping 12.Ratification 13. 13th, 14th, 15th Amendments 14.The Force Acts

    Courses

    (2023) US History(2022) US History

    Teacher Tools

    Objective 1 has fewer assessment questions available than configured.

    The number of questions from each objective must add up to exactly 10. It currently adds up to 10.

    2 - from Define Reconstruction and

    3 - from Explain the rights and

    3 - from Identify and describe the

    2 - from Describe the rise of the Ku

    4 Objectives

    2-5 Objectives is recommended

    Diagnostic Questions

    Each objective has at least one diagnostic question. Learn more

    Resources

    Each objective has at least two resources.

    Translations (Optional)

    Spanish

    0/7 questions translated.

    Standards

    California History Standards (4)

    Source : www.summitlearning.org

    Reconstruction & Southern Redemption Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Which statement best summarizes the beliefs of Booker T. Washington? 1.The best solution for African Americans was to return to Africa. 2.Social equality for African Americans would be easier to achieve than legal rights. 3.The way to dissolve the barriers of segregation and bring about an end to Jim Crow laws was by active, violent resistance. 4.The most immediate means for African Americans to achieve equality was to expand their opportunities for vocational education., "Although important strides were made, Reconstruction failed to provide lasting guarantees of the civil rights of the freedmen." Which evidence best supports this statement 1.passage of Jim Crow laws in the latter part of the 19th century 2.ratification of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments 3.refusal of Southern States to allow sharecropping 4.passage of the Civil Rights Acts of 1866, Which statement about the philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois is most accurate? 1.They differed as to the best way that African Americans could effectively achieve equality. 2.Both demanded programs that would provide for immediate social equality. 3.Both believed that vocational training would provide the most important kind of education for African Americans. 4.Neither wanted the Federal Government to play a major role in protecting the civil rights of African Americans. and more.

    Reconstruction & Southern Redemption

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    Which statement best summarizes the beliefs of Booker T. Washington?

    1.The best solution for African Americans was to return to Africa.

    2.Social equality for African Americans would be easier to achieve than legal rights.

    3.The way to dissolve the barriers of segregation and bring about an end to Jim Crow laws was by active, violent resistance.

    4.The most immediate means for African Americans to achieve equality was to expand their opportunities for vocational education.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    4.The most immediate means for African Americans to achieve equality was to expand their opportunities for vocational education.

    Click again to see term 👆

    "Although important strides were made, Reconstruction failed to provide lasting guarantees of the civil rights of the freedmen." Which evidence best supports this statement

    1.passage of Jim Crow laws in the latter part of the 19th century

    2.ratification of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments

    3.refusal of Southern States to allow sharecropping

    4.passage of the Civil Rights Acts of 1866

    Click card to see definition 👆

    1.passage of Jim Crow laws in the latter part of the 19th century

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/39 Created by ellendoliner

    Textbook solutions for this set

    The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century (California Edition)

    1st Edition

    Gerald A. Danzer, J. Jorge Klor de Alva, Larry S. Krieger, Louis E. Wilson, Nancy Woloch

    614 explanations

    Social Studies American History: Reconstruction to the Present Guided Reading Workbook

    1st Edition

    HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT

    1,031 explanations

    Search for a textbook or question

    Terms in this set (39)

    Which statement best summarizes the beliefs of Booker T. Washington?

    1.The best solution for African Americans was to return to Africa.

    2.Social equality for African Americans would be easier to achieve than legal rights.

    3.The way to dissolve the barriers of segregation and bring about an end to Jim Crow laws was by active, violent resistance.

    4.The most immediate means for African Americans to achieve equality was to expand their opportunities for vocational education.

    4.The most immediate means for African Americans to achieve equality was to expand their opportunities for vocational education.

    "Although important strides were made, Reconstruction failed to provide lasting guarantees of the civil rights of the freedmen." Which evidence best supports this statement

    1.passage of Jim Crow laws in the latter part of the 19th century

    2.ratification of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments

    3.refusal of Southern States to allow sharecropping

    4.passage of the Civil Rights Acts of 1866

    1.passage of Jim Crow laws in the latter part of the 19th century

    Which statement about the philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois is most accurate?

    1.They differed as to the best way that African Americans could effectively achieve equality.

    2.Both demanded programs that would provide for immediate social equality.

    3.Both believed that vocational training would provide the most important kind of education for African Americans.

    4.Neither wanted the Federal Government to play a major role in protecting the civil rights of African Americans.

    1.They differed as to the best way that African Americans could effectively achieve equality.

    Base your answer to the question below on the passage below and on your knowledge of social studies.

    "[The registrar] brought a big old book out there, and he gave me the sixteenth section of the constitution of Mississippi, . . . I could copy it like it was in the book, but after I got through copying it, he told me to give a reasonable interpretation and tell the meaning of the section I had copied. Well, I flunked out." Source: A History of the United States since 1861

    The main intent of the literacy test described in the passage was to

    1.encourage reform of the political system

    2.encourage Mississippi residents to learn about their state's legal system

    3.prevent African Americans from exercising a basic right

    4.enforce the provisions of the United States Constitution

    3.prevent African Americans from exercising a basic right

    The Jim Crow laws of the post-Civil War Era were attempts by

    1.the Federal Government to improve the status of African Americans and Native American Indians

    2.state and local governments to restrict the freedoms of African Americans

    3.states to ban organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan

    4.the Radical Republicans in Congress to carry out Reconstruction plans

    2.state and local governments to restrict the freedoms of African Americans

    The label "Solid South" was applied to the former Confederate States after Reconstruction because they

    1.consistently supported the Democratic Party

    2.could not participate in national politics

    3.rejected efforts to pass Jim Crow laws

    4.continued to support abolitionist causes

    1.consistently supported the Democratic Party

    The 14th amendment provides that no "state [shall] deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws." A direct result of this amendment was that

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