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    after passing a truck how do you know when it is safe to re-enter the lane in front of the truck?

    James

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    get after passing a truck how do you know when it is safe to re-enter the lane in front of the truck? from EN Bilgi.

    Standard 4 & 5 Review

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    Physical Ed

    10th

    10th Standard 4 & 5 Review

    Kevin Mallon 26 plays

    32 Qs

    Show Answers See Preview

    1. Fill-in-the-Blank

    1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Which area of the construction zone is the most dangerous?

    2. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    What sign or symbol communicates to roadway users that a vehicle is considered a slow moving vehicle?

    answer choices

    Flashing yellow lights

    Flashing blue lights

    Red yield sign

    Orange reflective triangle

    3. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    When is it appropriate to tap your horn?

    answer choices

    When you want to be seen and/or warn others

    When you want to warn someone and/or get their attention

    When you want to change lanes, turn or there are hazards in your lane

    When you want to communicate your intent to slow down or stop

    4. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    When is it appropriate to flash your brake lights?

    answer choices

    When you want to be seen and/or warn others

    When you want to warn someone and/or get their attention

    When you want to change lanes, turn or there are hazards in your lane

    When you want to communicate your intent to slow down or stop

    5. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    When is it appropriate to flash your head lights?

    answer choices

    When you want to be seen and/or warn others

    When you want to warn someone and/or get their attention

    When you want to change lanes, turn or there are hazards in your lane

    When you want to communicate your intent to slow down or stop

    6. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    What are bicycles considered on the roadway?

    answer choices Their own thing Pedestrians Hybrids Vehicles 7. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Because they are smaller vehicles, what must you do for a motorcyclist when you encounter them on a roadway?

    answer choices

    Treat them like a typical car

    Give them more space

    Give them less space

    Treat them like a bicycle

    8. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Because they are larger vehicles, what must you do for a semi-trucks and RVs when you encounter them on a roadway?

    answer choices

    Treat them like a typical car

    Give them more space

    Give them less space

    Treat them like a bicycle

    9. Fill-in-the-Blank

    1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Where is the largest no zone for a large truck located?

    10. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    How can you tell if the driver of a large truck can see you?

    answer choices

    If you can see the driver

    If you can see the license plate

    If you have your headlights on

    If you are also in a truck

    11. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    After passing a truck how do you know when it is safe to re-enter the lane in front of the truck?

    answer choices

    You have moved passed the front bumper of the truck

    You can see the front bumper of the truck in your passenger side window

    The truck driver honks their horn

    You can see the entire front of the truck and the wheels in your rear view mirror

    You can see the grill of the truck in your rear view mirror

    12. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    In this scenario, which cars must stop for the bus?

    answer choices

    The cars traveling on the same road as the bus must stop

    The cars traveling in the opposite direction as the bus must stop

    Only the cars behind the bus must stop

    Only the cars driving towards the bus must stop

    All cars must stop 13. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    In this scenario, which cars must stop for the school bus?

    answer choices

    Only the purple car must stop

    Only the cars traveling on the opposite side of the median must stop

    Only the cars on the same side of the median as the bus must stop

    All the cars must stop

    14. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    The visual path from your vehicle to the target area is your:

    answer choices Path of travel Line of sight Field of vision Target area 15. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    The series of continuous positions your vehicle will occupy while traveling toward your target is your:

    answer choices Path of travel Line of sight Field of vision Target area 16. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    What plays a factor in your stopping distance?

    answer choices Perception time Reaction time Braking distance All of the above 17. Multiple-choice 30 seconds 5 pts Q.

    How would you explain closed zone around your vehicle?

    answer choices

    Space or area that is not available in the vehicles path of travel

    Space where you can drive without restrictions

    Open zone that is becoming closed or closed space that is becoming open

    18. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    How would you explain open zone around your vehicle?

    Source : quizizz.com

    Vehicle Positioning

    Following Distances Suppose you are on a two-lane road with an oncoming vehicle approaching and a bicyclist ahead to your right. Instead of driving between the vehicle and the bicyclist, take one danger at a time. First, slow down and let the oncoming vehicle pass. Then, when it is safe, move to the left to […]

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    SECTION 20 OF 28

    Vehicle Positioning

    HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Following Distances

    Suppose you are on a two-lane road with an oncoming vehicle approaching and a bicyclist ahead to your right. Instead of driving between the vehicle and the bicyclist, take one danger at a time. First, slow down and let the oncoming vehicle pass. Then, when it is safe, move to the left to allow plenty of room (at least 3 feet) to pass the bicyclist.

    Persons Who Present Dangers to Drivers

    Increase your following distance and allow a bigger space cushion for drivers who may be potentially dangerous. Persons who present dangers are:

    Drivers who cannot see you because their view is blocked by buildings, trees, or other cars.

    Drivers backing out of driveways or parking spaces.

    Drivers who pass you when there is a curve or oncoming vehicle(s) ahead.

    Drivers about to be forced into your lane to avoid a vehicle, pedestrian, bicyclist, obstruction, or because of fewer lanes ahead.

    Pedestrians with umbrellas in front of their faces or hats pulled down over their eyes.

    Distracted people, such as:

    Delivery persons.

    Construction workers.

    Distracted pedestrians, such as those talking or texting on their electronic wireless communications device.

    Children, who often run into the street without looking.

    Drivers talking or texting on their electronic wireless communications device or speaking to their passengers.

    Drivers taking care of children, eating, or looking at maps while driving.

    Confused people, such as:

    Tourists, often at complicated intersections.

    Drivers who are looking for a house number or slow down for no apparent reason.

    Splitting the Difference

    Sometimes there will be dangers on both sides of the road at the same time. For example, there will be parked cars to the right and oncoming cars to the left. In this case, the best thing to do is “split the difference.” Steer a middle course between the oncoming cars and the parked cars.

    If one danger is greater than the other, give the most room to the most dangerous situation. Suppose there are oncoming cars on your left side and a child on a bike on your right side. The child is more likely to make a sudden move. Therefore, slow down and, if safe, use as much of your lane to the left as possible until you pass the child.

    Space to Merge

    Enter the freeway at or near the speed of traffic. Do not stop before merging into freeway traffic, unless it is absolutely necessary. Freeway traffic has the right-of-way. When it is safe, follow the “3-second rule” (refer to the “Do not be a tailgater!” section).

    Do not try to merge into a gap that is too small.

    Watch for vehicles around you. Use your mirrors and turn signals. Turn your head to look quickly over your shoulder before changing lanes or merging in traffic. Leave 3 seconds of space between you and the vehicle ahead of you. Make sure you can stop safely, if necessary.

    If you need to cross several freeway lanes, cross them one at a time. If you wait until all of the lanes are clear, you may cause traffic delays or a collision.

    Space to Cross or Enter

    When crossing or entering city or highway traffic from a full stop, signal, and leave a large enough gap to get up to the speed of other vehicles. You must share the space with traffic already on the road. It is important to know how much space you need for merging, crossing, entering, and exiting out of traffic. You need a gap that is about:

    Half a block on city streets.

    A full block on the highway.

    If you are crossing lanes or turning, make sure there are no vehicles or people blocking the path ahead or to the sides of your vehicle. You do not want to be caught in an intersection with traffic coming at you.

    Even if you have the green traffic signal light, do not start across the intersection if there are vehicles blocking your way.

    When turning left, do not start the turn just because an approaching vehicle has its right turn signal on. The driver may plan to turn just beyond you, or the signal may have been left on from an earlier turn. This is particularly true of motorcycles. Their signal lights often do not turn off automatically. Wait until the other driver actually starts to turn before you continue.

    Space to Exit

    When you plan to exit the freeway, give yourself plenty of time. You should know the name or number of the freeway exit you want, as well as the one that comes before it. To exit safely:

    Signal, look over your shoulder, and change lanes one at a time until you are in the proper lane to exit the freeway.

    Signal your intention to exit for approximately 5 seconds before reaching the exit.

    Be sure you are at the proper speed for leaving the traffic lane–not too fast (so you remain in control) and not too slow (so the flow of traffic can still move freely).

    Passing

    Passing When Approaching to Pass

    Before you pass, look ahead for road conditions and traffic that may cause other vehicles to move into your lane. Only pass when safe to do so. You must judge whether you have enough room to pass whenever you approach:

    An oncoming vehicle.

    A hill or curve.

    Source : www.dmv.ca.gov

    Passing Safely

    Passing Safely and other safe driving habits presented by Comedy Traffic School .com

    Passing Safely

    Passing Safely Most of the time, whenever drivers must pass another driver, they will be doing so on the left. Therefore, the following instructions refer to passing safely on the left.

    Passing Safely | Comedy Traffic School .com

    Drivers should be sure that it is legal to pass where they are intending to pass.Drivers should turn on their turn signal before moving into the passing lane.Drivers should check the road ahead for oncoming traffic. There is a passing distance, called the PASSING RANGE, which is required for each separate instance of passing. The speed of the vehicle being passed and its speed while passing determine this passing maneuver time. If, as a driver, you are certain an oncoming vehicle will not enter your passing range while you are passing, go ahead and pass. If you are uncertain, use good judgment and do not pass. A rapid decision like this can save your life.Before they pull out into the passing lane, drivers should check both rear view mirrors to make sure someone has not first decided to pass them.Drivers should check their “blind spot” by looking over their left shoulder.Once drivers have checked the front once more and determined it is safe and have established a safe response time, should a possible hazard arise, then they may move out into the passing lane to make the pass. Motorists should not signal their intention to pass by flicking their high beams. High beams can blind oncoming drivers.Drivers should accelerate at least 10 to 15 miles per hour faster than the car they intend to pass as long as they do not exceed the speed limit.Play it safe to pass another day.If you are in the slightest doubt about the distance required to pass safely, do not do it! It is as simple as that.Once drivers have passed the vehicle in front of them, they should check their inside rear view mirror. They should not re-enter into the regular lane until theycan clearly see the vehicle they just passed in their inside rear view mirror! When they can see the vehicle, they should first signal their intention to move back intothe lane.Re-entering the lane should be done smoothly and the driver should resume a speed consistent with the speed limit.There are a few instances when passing on the right is permitted:A driver may pass on the right when another vehicle is preparing to make a left turn and there is room to pass safely on the roadway.Drivers may pass on the right when they are on the open road and there are two or more lanes marked in their direction.A driver may pass on the right when in a business or residential area where the road is wide enough for two or more vehicles traveling in the same direction.When passing vehicles going in the same direction on a one-way road.When the left half of the road is blocked.When another vehicle is turning left at an intersection, into or out of, a private road or driveway.

    When is Passing Illegal?

    As far as driving goes, illegal and dumb are really just the same thing. Traffic laws are instituted to protect you. As you examine these rules, you may wish to consider this fact: At 60 mph, a driver will travel 132 feet in 1.5 seconds (60 mph is 1 mile per minute, or 88 ft. a second!). At that speed, if you collide with another vehicle, you needn’t worry about getting a ticket. Chances are very good that a ticket will never be issued. The police do not give tickets to seriously injured or dead people. The following situations are examples of when passing can be dangerous if not deadly…

    Special Situations

    A driver may not pass within 100 feet of a railroad crossing.A driver may not pass within 100 feet of, or in the middle of, an intersection.Drivers may not pass on a curve (even a slight curve) when they cannot see far enough to guarantee safety.Drivers may not pass while ascending a hill when they cannot see far enough to pass safely. Remember, a driver’s ability to accelerate away from danger is impaired while ascending a hill. Drivers may not pass within 100 feet of a bridge, abutment, tunnel, or viaduct when their view is impaired or when there is no available escape route should they meet an oncoming vehicle.Drivers may not pass Class A and Class B vehicles (such as large trucks and RV’s) on the right. These vehicles should always be passed on the left.

    Dangerous Situations

    Drivers may not pass if passing safely requires them to exceed the posted speed limit.Drivers may not pass when there is not ample safe passing distance between them and on-coming vehicles.A driver may not pass when a cyclist, pedestrian, or parked vehicle is along the shoulder of the road. Can you see the reason why? In a sudden emergency situation, the vehicle being passed has no room to evade safely.

    Source : www.comedytrafficschool.com

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    James 1 month ago
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