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    after frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. what is most likely occurring in her body? heavy breathing during exercise has produced an oxygen surplus in her muscles. this oxygen is being transported to her lungs. this is a result of aerobic respiration. heavy breathing during exercise has produced a carbon dioxide surplus in her muscles. lactate is being transported to her liver. this is a result of aerobic respiration. strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in carbon dioxide debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. this is a result of anaerobic respiration. strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. this is a result of anaerobic respiration.

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    get after frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. what is most likely occurring in her body? heavy breathing during exercise has produced an oxygen surplus in her muscles. this oxygen is being transported to her lungs. this is a result of aerobic respiration. heavy breathing during exercise has produced a carbon dioxide surplus in her muscles. lactate is being transported to her liver. this is a result of aerobic respiration. strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in carbon dioxide debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. this is a result of anaerobic respiration. strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. this is a result of anaerobic respiration. from EN Bilgi.

    Your lungs and exercise

    This factsheet explains how exercise affects the lungs, how breathing is influenced by activity and the benefits of exercise for people with and without a lung condition.

    Breathe (Sheff). 2016 Mar; 12(1): 97–100.

    doi: 10.1183/20734735.ELF121

    PMCID: PMC4818249 PMID: 27066145

    Your lungs and exercise

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    Abstract

    This factsheet explains how exercise affects the lungs, how breathing is influenced by activity and the benefits of exercise for people with and without a lung condition.

    Regular physical activity and exercise improves quality of life, whether you are healthy or you have a lung condition. Many people associate keeping fit with maintaining a healthy heart, losing weight and reducing the risk of illnesses such as diabetes, but exercise also helps keep lungs healthy.

    This factsheet explains how exercise affects the lungs, how breathing is influenced by activity and the benefits of exercise for people with and without a lung condition.

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    What is exercise and how much should I do?

    Any type of physical activity counts as exercise. It could be planned sport such as running, swimming, tennis or bowls, an exercise training programme, or a hobby such as cycling or walking.

    It could also include physical activities which are part of your daily life, such as gardening, cleaning or walking to the shops.

    In order to stay healthy, you should do 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days per week. For a healthy person, moderate exercise might be walking at a pace of 4 to 6 km per hour. If you have a lung problem, you would need to walk fast enough to make you moderately breathless.

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    What happens to my lungs when I exercise?

    During exercise, two of the important organs of the body come into action: the heart and the lungs. The lungs bring oxygen into the body, to provide energy, and remove carbon dioxide, the waste product created when you produce energy. The heart pumps the oxygen to the muscles that are doing the exercise.

    When you exercise and your muscles work harder, your body uses more oxygen and produces more carbon dioxide. To cope with this extra demand, your breathing has to increase from about 15 times a minute (12 litres of air) when you are resting, up to about 40–60 times a minute (100 litres of air) during exercise. Your circulation also speeds up to take the oxygen to the muscles so that they can keep moving.

    When your lungs are healthy, you keep a large breathing reserve. You may feel ‘out of breath’ after exercise, but you will not be ‘short of breath’. When you have reduced lung function, you may use a large part of your breathing reserve. This may make you feel ‘out of breath’, which can be an unpleasant feeling, but it is not generally dangerous.

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    What are the benefits of exercise?

    It is normal to get breathless during exercise. However, regular exercise can increase the strength and function of your muscles, making them more efficient. Your muscles will require less oxygen to move and they will produce less carbon dioxide. This will immediately reduce the amount of air you will need to breathe in and out for a given exercise. Training also improves your circulation and strengthens your heart.

    Exercise will improve your overall physical and psychological well-being. It can decrease the risk of developing other conditions such as stroke, heart disease and depression. Regular exercise is also one of the most important interventions to prevent the onset of type-II diabetes.

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    What can I do to help my lungs cope with exercise?

    The most important thing to do to keep your lungs healthy is to look after them. Smoking will affect your ability to undertake physical activity and reach your true potential. If you quit smoking, you are likely to be able to exercise for longer as early as two weeks after your last cigarette. The ELF factsheet on ‘Smoking and the lungs’ can provide more information on this topic.

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    Can exercise cause any problems with the lungs?

    People who follow high-intensity training regimes, or who regularly train in certain environments, may be at risk of developing exercise-induced asthma, or a condition known as bronchial hyperresponsiveness in which the airways become blocked after exercise. If take bronchodilators, you should normally take these 10 minutes before you exercise to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Your doctor can give you advice on this.

    Scientists believe this is caused by harmful substances in the environment in which they are training, such as chlorine in a swimming pool, or cold dry air on a ski slope. Endurance athletes have the potential to inhale more harmful substances into their lungs, as they are exposed to these conditions for longer periods of time. Our factsheet, ‘Asthma in elite athletes’, provides more information on this.

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    After Frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. What is most likely occurring in her

    After Frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. What is most likely occurring in her body? 1. … Get the answers you need, now!

    12/21/2018 Biology High School

    answered • expert verified

    After Frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. What is most likely occurring in her body?

    1. Heavy breathing during exercise has produced an oxygen surplus in her muscles. This oxygen is being transported to her lungs. This is a result of aerobic respiration.

    2. Heavy breathing during exercise has produced a carbon dioxide surplus in her muscles. Lactate is being transported to her liver. This is a result of aerobic respiration.

    3. Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in carbon dioxide debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

    4. Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

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    Expert-verified answer

    Virtuoso 8.1K answers 27.8M people helped

    We have that for the Question ,it can be said that

    Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

    Option 4

    From the question we are told

    After Frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. What is most likely occurring in her body?

    1. Heavy breathing during exercise has produced an oxygen surplus in her muscles. This oxygen is being transported to her lungs. This is a result of aerobic respiration.

    2. Heavy breathing during exercise has produced a carbon dioxide surplus in her muscles. Lactate is being transported to her liver. This is a result of aerobic respiration.

    3. Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in carbon dioxide debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

    4. Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

    Generally

    When we as humans exercise we experience a need for more oxygen as our muscles work harder .

    The Body requires more oxygen when we exercise in other to cope.

    ThereforeWhat is most likely occurring in her body is

    Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

    Option 4

    For more information on this visit

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    1jaiz4 and 12 more users found this answer helpful

    4.5 (6 votes)

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    Answer

    Ambitious 1.1K answers 2.6M people helped

    The correct answer is 4 !!

    Strenuous exercise causes oxygen debt and anaerbic respiration is going on !! Thats why Lactic acid is formed !! Lactic acid formation is the direct result of anaerobic respiration !!

    Still stuck?

    grendeldekt and 141 more users found this answer helpful

    4.9 (59 votes)

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    jasmineholland9 asked 03/13/2018

    After Frida stops exercising, she continues to breathe heavily. What is most likely occurring in her body? Heavy breathing during exercise has produced an oxygen surplus in her muscles. This oxygen is being transported to her lungs. This is a result of aerobic respiration. Heavy breathing during exercise has produced a carbon dioxide surplus in her muscles. Lactate is being transported to her liver. This is a result of aerobic respiration. Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in carbon dioxide debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration. Strenuous exercise has caused her body to be in oxygen debt, and she is breathing hard while lactate is transported to the liver. This is a result of anaerobic respiration.

    7 Qurabubbeyaso asked 08/06/2016

    A boxer has been jumping rope for an hour. His leg muscles are burning and he feels weak. Which substance is most likely the cause of the burning he feels in his muscles? A - Carbon Dioxide produced by aerobic respiration. B - Products produced by alcohol fermentation C - Oxygen produced from breathing too hard D - waste products from anaerobic respiration

    4.7/5 75 bbasedqueen asked 09/28/2018

    Source : brainly.com

    Anaerobic respiration

    Study the two types of respiration, aerobic and anaerobic. Revise the structure and function of the lungs.

    Bitesize GCSE WJEC

    The respiratory system in humans

    Part of

    Biology (Single Science)Cells, organ systems and ecosystems

    Anaerobic respiration

    Anaerobic respiration does not need oxygen (unlike aerobic respiration). It is the release of a relatively small amount of energy in cells by the breakdown of food substances in the absence of oxygen.

    Anaerobic respiration in muscles

    Anaerobic respiration happens in muscles during hard exercise.

    glucose→lactic acid + energy in the form of ATP

    Glucose is not completely broken down, so less energy is released than during aerobic respiration.

    There is a build-up of lactic acid in the muscles during vigorous exercise. The lactic acid needs to be oxidised to carbon dioxide and water later.

    The creation of lactic acid (which needs oxygen to be broken down) generates an oxygen debt that needs to be repaid after the exercise stops. This is why we keep on breathing deeply for a few minutes after we have finished exercising.

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    A short intense burst of exercise such as sprinting will generate energy anaerobically so an oxygen debt will be generated. This is because your body will have released energy without the oxygen it would normally have used performing low intensity exercise like slow, steady running.

    The difference between the oxygen the body needs during the sudden sprint and what it actually managed to take in is called oxygen deficit.

    Aerobic respiration vs anaerobic respiration

    The table summarises some differences between the two types of respiration.

    Oxygen Needed Not needed Glucose breakdown Complete Incomplete End product(s)

    Carbon dioxide and water

    Animal cells - lactic acid. Plant cells and yeast - carbon dioxide and ethanol

    Energy released

    Relatively large amount from each glucose molecule

    Relatively small amount from each glucose molecule

    Question

    Aerobic respiration produces 38 molecules of ATP, but anaerobic respiration produces only two molecules of ATP. In comparison to aerobic respiration, what percentage of ATP is produced by anaerobic respiration?

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