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    BLS Adult Cardiac Arrest Algorithm

    BLS Healthcare Provider Adult Cardiac Arrest Algorithm from ACLS.com that shows the steps for both single rescuers and multiple rescuers in the case of an unresponsive adult.

    March 3, 2020

    BLS Adult Cardiac Arrest Algorithm

    What do you do when someone is in cardiac arrest? Use this algorithm for cardiac arrest to improve patient outcomes and survival rates.

    Verify scene safety. If you encounter a potential cardiac arrest victim who exhibits cardiac arrest symptoms, first make sure the scene is safe for both the rescuers and the victim.Check responsiveness. Get help. Check for responsiveness. First tap the victim and shout “HEY! HEY! Are you OK?” If they do not respond, shout for help. Activate the emergency response system. If you are alone, retrieve an AED and other emergency equipment. Send someone to get it if others are available.Assess for breathing and pulse. When assessing signs of cardiac arrest in an unresponsive patient, check for absent or abnormal breathing by watching the chest for movements for 5 to 10 seconds. Simultaneously check the carotid pulse for a minimum of 5 seconds—but no more than 10 seconds—to determine if there is a pulse present. It’s important to minimize delay in starting CPR, so take no more than 10 seconds to assess the patient.

    If the victim has a pulse and is breathing normally, monitor them until emergency responders arrive.

    If the victim has a pulse but is breathing abnormally, maintain the patient’s airway and begin rescue breathing. Administer one breath every 5 to 6 seconds, not exceeding 10 to 12 breaths per minute. Activate the emergency response system if you haven’t already done so. Check the patient’s pulse every 2 minutes. If at any point there is no pulse present, begin administering CPR. If you suspect a possible opioid overdose, administer naloxone if available and protocols allow.

    Begin CPR. If a pulse is not identified within 10 seconds, immediately begin administering CPR, starting with chest compressions. Compressions should occur at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute, with a depth of 2 inches. Use a compression-to-ventilation ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths.Attempt defibrillation with the AED. The AED should be used as soon as it arrives or is ready. Follow the prompts on the AED to check for a shockable rhythm.

    If the AED advises that the patient has a shockable rhythm, follow the prompts, clear the patient, and deliver the shock. Immediately resume CPR, starting with compressions, for 2 minutes or until the AED prompts you to check the patient’s rhythm again. Compressions should not be discontinued for more than 10 seconds. Continue providing CPR and following the AED prompts until ALS providers can take over or the victim begins to breathe, move, or react.

    If the AED advises that the patient’s rhythm is nonshockable or no shock is advised, immediately resume CPR, starting with compressions. Continue CPR for 2 minutes, or until the AED prompts you to check the patient’s rhythm again. Compressions should not be discontinued for more than 10 seconds. Continue providing CPR and following the AED prompts until ALS providers can take over or the victim begins to breathe, move, or react.

    Source : resources.acls.com

    First Aid: Rescue Breathing

    First Aid: Rescue Breathing

    Rescue breathing is needed if a person collapses and stops breathing. In CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), rescue breathing may also follow chest compressions if a person's heart is not beating. A person may need rescue breathing in the following situations:

    Near drowning

    Overdose or poisoning

    Choking

    Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Severe asthma attack

    By breathing into another person's lungs (rescue breathing), you can supply enough oxygen to preserve life. Act quickly, because brain damage can occur after only 3 minutes without oxygen.

    If the person is a baby or child (age 1 to puberty) and he or she is not breathing but has a pulse, give 1 rescue breath every 3 to 5 seconds or about 12 to 20 breaths per minute.

    If the person is a baby or child (age 1 to puberty) and he or she is not breathing and has no pulse, do chest compressions and rescue breathing for 2 minutes (5 cycles) of 30 compressions and 2 rescue breaths, then call 911. Push fast, at least 100 to 120 compressions per minute. Give 1 breath every 6 seconds (10 breaths/minute).

    In adults, call 911 first and do the following:

    If the person is not breathing but has a pulse, give 1 rescue breath every 5 to 6 seconds or about 10 to 12 breaths per minute.

    If the person is not breathing and has no pulse and you are not trained in CPR, give hands-only chest compression CPR without rescue breaths.

    If the person is not breathing and has no pulse and you are trained in CPR, begin CPR, giving 30 chest compressions followed by 2 rescue breaths. Push hard and fast.

    Note: If you are alone, not trained in CPR, and a phone is nearby, call 911.

    Protective face mask

    You may use a protective face mask.  Follow the instructions that came with the mask.

    Step 1. Open the airway

    Place the victim on his or her back.

    Press your palm against the person's forehead. At the same time, hook your fingers under the chin and lift it away from the spine, as if pulling out a drawer. This tilts the head back and opens the airway.

    If there is a possibility of a head, neck, or spin injury, place the victim on his or her back without moving the neck or chin.

    Step 2. Check for breathing

    Look to see if the chest is rising.

    Listen for normal breathing (not gasping for air).

    If there is no normal breathing, start mouth-to-mouth breathing as described in Steps 3 to 5.

    Step 3. Pinch and seal

    Adults and children (age 1 to puberty):

    Keep the head tilted back and chin up

    Pinch the victim's nostrils together with your thumb and first finger. Or follow your face mask instructions.

    If you don't have a protective barrier, seal your lips over the victim's open mouth.

    Note: If the victim's mouth can't be opened, you can seal your lips over the victim's nose.

    Babies (up to age 1):

    Cover the baby's nose and mouth with your mouth or a protective barrier.

    Step 4. Start with 2 "rescue" breaths

    Adults and children (age 1 to puberty):

    Breathe into the victim's mouth for 1 second. Watch for the chest to rise.

    If the chest rises, breathe into the victim's mouth a second time.

    If the chest doesn't rise, tilt the victim's head back and chin up again. Then breathe into the victim's mouth a second time.

    Babies (up to age 1):

    Give 2 gentle puffs or breaths of air instead of a deep breath. Each puff should last 1 second.

    If the chest rises, breathe a gentle puff or breathe into the victim's mouth a second time.

    If the chest doesn't rise, tilt the victim's head back and chin up again. Then breathe into the victim's mouth a second time.

    If the chest still doesn't rise, check inside the mouth for a foreign object after chest compressions. If an object is visible, sweep the mouth with your fingers and remove the object. Take care not to push the object further into the throat.

    Step 5. Give more breaths

    Adults and children (ages 1 to puberty):

    Give 2 breaths after 30 chest compressions until the person starts breathing or emergency medical services arrive.

    Babies (up to age 1):

    Give 2 breaths after 30 chest compressions until the infant starts breathing or emergency medical services arrive.

    It is best to be prepared in the event of an emergency. Look for classes offered by your local hospital, the American Heart Association, or the American Red Cross in your area or on the Internet.

    Source : www.fairview.org

    BLS Flashcards

    Start studying BLS. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    BLS

    Dispatch calls you and your partner to the gym where there is an unresponsive female. The person collapsed during the workout.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    You come to the place with an AED and ready to do CPR

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    You tap and shout to check for responsiveness but the patient does not respond. What is your next step after calling for help?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    check for breathing and pulse

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    1/16 Created by Sienna_Hancock1

    Terms in this set (16)

    Dispatch calls you and your partner to the gym where there is an unresponsive female. The person collapsed during the workout.

    You come to the place with an AED and ready to do CPR

    You tap and shout to check for responsiveness but the patient does not respond. What is your next step after calling for help?

    check for breathing and pulse

    after checking for breathing and a pulse, you find that the patient is not breathing normally but does have a pulse. Rescue breaths are needed. What is the ventilation rate?

    1 breath every 6 seconds...10 breaths per minute

    check for pulse every 2 minutes and do CPR if there is no pulse

    after 4 minutes of rescue breathing, there appears to be no pulse. what do you do next?

    immediately begin CPR

    as you are doing CPR, your colleague arrives and has the AED. he follows the prompts and the AED analyzes the rhythm and does NOT devise a shock.

    you continue CPR. what do you do next?

    continue CPR until AED says to do a rhythm check, the ALs team arrives, or the patient starts to move

    how to check pulse on infant

    2 or 3 fingers on inside of the upper arm...halfway between shoulder and elbow

    components of chest compressions for children

    rate: 100/120 depth: 2 in

    hands: 2 or 1 on lower place of breastbone

    components of infant chest compressions

    rate: 100/120 depth: 1.5 in

    hands: 2 fingers just below nipple line in center

    recommended compression to ventilation ratios for infants and children

    1 rescuer: 30 2 rescuers: 2 pediatric BLS verify scene safety

    check for responsiveness...tap shoulders and are you Ok?..activate emergency response or have someone do it and get AED

    no normal breathing but pulse...rescue breaths every 2-3 seconds

    heart rate less than 60 bpm?...being CPR

    dispatch calls you to a family home and there is a 6 year old who is unresponsive. the scene is safe and you have the AED.

    you tap his shoulders and ask if he is ok

    he is unresponsive and might be in cardiac arrest. what is your next step?

    for 5-10 seconds look for breathing or gasping and feel the carotid for a pulse

    after checking breathing and a pulse, you see he is not breathing but does have a pulse. how do you deliver rescue breaths?

    1 breath every 2/3 seconds..20-30 breaths per minute

    an AED is used and a shock is delivered. what CPR ratio of compressions to breaths do you use?

    30 compressions and 2 breaths

    local day care calls and says there is an unconcious infant. you and your partner go

    scene is safe and child unresponsive

    the infant is unresponsive after tapping her foot and asking if she was ok. what do you do?

    5-10 seconds look for no breathing..check brachial

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