if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    african american males perception of law enforcement

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get african american males perception of law enforcement from EN Bilgi.

    "African

    This study compared the psychophysiological reactivity of African American and European American males to authority. Nineteen African American males and 23 European American males were randomly assigned to either be interrogated by a police officer, or see a police officer interrogate that experimenter or view a videotape of police activity. Participants' physiological reactivity, acceptance of authority, fear of negative evaluation or social anxiety, and apprehension and anxiety in stressful situations as well as EMG, SCR, heart rate, respiration, and blood pressure were measured. African American males were hypothesized to show greater physiological response than European American males and participants who scored highly on each of the three measures to demonstrate more intense physiological responses. Data were analyzed with separate (race by treatment by time period) analyses of variance. A race x time period interaction occurred: African American male undergraduates exhibited greater increases in blood pressure and heart rate reactivity and took longer to return to baseline following presentation of stimuli than European American males in corresponding treatment groups.

    Skip to main content

    ODU Digital Commons

    < Previous

    Home About FAQ My Account Next >

    Home > Sciences > Psychology > ETDs > 253

    PSYCHOLOGY THESES & DISSERTATIONS

    African-American Males' Perception of Law Enforcement: A Psychophysiological Perspective

    Adolph Brown III, Old Dominion University

    Date of Award

    Summer 1997

    Document Type

    Dissertation

    Degree Name

    Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

    Department

    Psychology

    Program/Concentration

    Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology

    Committee Director

    Ellen F. Rosen

    Committee Member

    Delanyard Robinson

    Committee Member

    Harold Conley

    Committee Member

    Ronald Thomas

    Committee Member

    Joy Kannarkat

    Abstract

    This study compared the psychophysiological reactivity of African American and European American males to authority. Nineteen African American males and 23 European American males were randomly assigned to either be interrogated by a police officer, or see a police officer interrogate that experimenter or view a videotape of police activity. Participants' physiological reactivity, acceptance of authority, fear of negative evaluation or social anxiety, and apprehension and anxiety in stressful situations as well as EMG, SCR, heart rate, respiration, and blood pressure were measured. African American males were hypothesized to show greater physiological response than European American males and participants who scored highly on each of the three measures to demonstrate more intense physiological responses. Data were analyzed with separate (race by treatment by time period) analyses of variance. A race x time period interaction occurred: African American male undergraduates exhibited greater increases in blood pressure and heart rate reactivity and took longer to return to baseline following presentation of stimuli than European American males in corresponding treatment groups.

    Comments

    A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculties of The College of William and Mary, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk State University, Old Dominion University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology through the Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology.

    DOI

    10.25777/sa9t-qm88

    ISBN

    9780591623307

    Recommended Citation

    Brown, Adolph. "African-American Males' Perception of Law Enforcement: A Psychophysiological Perspective" (1997). Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Dissertation, Psychology, Old Dominion University, DOI: 10.25777/sa9t-qm88

    https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/253

    Download 4,047 DOWNLOADS

    Since September 16, 2019

    PLUMX METRICS

    INCLUDED IN

    Biological Psychology Commons, Criminology Commons, Personality and Social Contexts Commons

    SHARE

    Search

    Advanced Search

    Notify me via email or RSS

    Browse

    Collections Disciplines Authors

    Contribute

    Author Guidelines

    Links

    Department of Psychology

    Other Digital Collections

    ODU Libraries

    Old Dominion University

    Contact Us

    Digital Commons Manager

    Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement

    Privacy Copyright

    Source : digitalcommons.odu.edu

    African

    AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES PERCEPTIONS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT: A PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE Adolph Brown, III Virginia Consortium for Professional Psychology Chair: Dr. Ellen F. Rosen, College o f William and Mary This study compared the psychophysiological reactivity of African American and European American males to authority. Nineteen African American males and 23 European American males were randomly assigned to either be interrogated by a police officer, or see a police officer interrogate the experimenter or view a videotape of police activity. Participants’ physiological reactivity, acceptance of authority, fear of negative evaluation or social anxiety, and apprehension and anxiety in stressful situations as well as EMG, SCR, heart rate, respiration, and blood pressure were measured. African American males were hypothesized to show greater physiological response than European American males and participants who scored highly on each of the three measures to demonstrate more intense physiological responses. Data were analyzed with separate (race by treatment by time period) analyses of variance. A race X time period interaction occurred:

    DOI:10.25777/SA9T-QM88Corpus ID: 204389450

    African-American Males' Perception of Law Enforcement: A Psychophysiological Perspective

    @inproceedings{Brown1997AfricanAmericanMP,

    title={African-American Males' Perception of Law Enforcement: A Psychophysiological Perspective},

    author={Adolph Brown},

    year={1997} } A. Brown Published 1997 Psychology

    AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES PERCEPTIONS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT: A PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE Adolph Brown, III Virginia Consortium for Professional Psychology Chair: Dr. Ellen F. Rosen, College o f William and Mary This study compared the psychophysiological reactivity of African American and European American males to authority. Nineteen African American males and 23 European American males were randomly assigned to either be interrogated by a police officer, or see a police officer interrogate…

    View via Publisher

    digitalcommons.odu.edu

    Tables from this paper

    Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 58 REFERENCES

    Relationship of racial stressors to blood pressure responses and anger expression in black college students.

    C. Armstead, K. Lawler, G. Gorden, J. Cross, J. Gibbons

    Psychology

    Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

    1989 TLDR

    Exposure to racist stimuli was associated with BP increases among Blacks and cumulative exposure to racism may have important implications for the etiology of essential hypertension.

    227

    Individual Differences in Physiological Responses to Fearful, Racially Noxious, and Neutral Imagery

    M. Sutherland, J. Harrell

    Psychology 1986

    Mental imagery has recently emerged as an alternative to traditional laboratory stressors in psychophysiological studies. The present study assessed physiological responsivity to fearful, neutral,…

    52

    Network Structure Support: Its Relationship to the Psychosocial Development of Black Females

    F. Miller Psychology 1988

    People's attitudes toward self and others are a product of the type of interactions experienced in their social environment. Consistent with this reasoning, the object of this study was to ascertain…

    23

    Cynical hostility and cardiovascular reactivity during self‐disclosure.

    A. Christensen, T. W. Smith

    Psychology

    Psychosomatic medicine

    1993 TLDR

    Among subjects participating in the self‐disclosure discussion task, hostile individuals displayed significantly greater blood pressure reactivity compared with subjects low in hostility, support the psychophysiological reactivity model of hostility and health, and underscore the potential importance of social context in the psychosomatic process.

    145

    Effect of harassment and competition upon cardiovascular and plasma catecholamine responses in type A and type B individuals.

    D. C. Glass, L. Krakoff, +6 authors E. Elting

    Psychology, Biology Psychophysiology 1980 TLDR

    A's showed greater blood pressure and plasma epinephrine evaluations than B's when both types were confronted by the challenge of task performance, and considered the role of sympathetic activation in mediating the tendency of Type A individuals to develop coronary heart disease.

    250

    Types of stressful situations and their relation to trait anxiety and sex.

    W. F. Hodges, J. Felling

    Psychology

    Journal of consulting and clinical psychology

    1970 60

    The Sentencing Decisions of Black and White Judges: Expected and Unexpected Similarities

    C. Spohn Law 1990

    Those who champion the representation of blacks on the bench argue that black judges may make a difference. Indeed, some suggest that increasing the proportion of black judges might result in more…

    137

    Clinical Behavioral Medicine: Some Concepts and Procedures

    Ian Wickramasekera PhD

    Psychology, Medicine

    1988 TLDR

    This book discusses self-Hypnosis and the Common Components of Other Stress-Reduction Techniques: A Theory, and the Diagnosis and Psychophysiological Management of Chronic Pain and Anxiety.

    35

    The Socialization into Criminality: On Becoming a Prisoner and a Guard.

    C. Haney, P. Zimbardo

    Psychology, Sociology

    1974

    Abstract : A discussion of the way in which persons become institutionalized and institutionally socialized is presented. Special attention is given to the form these processes take in the…

    25

    Orientation to authority and its relation to impulsiveness

    P. Heaven Psychology 1989

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between orientation to authority and impulsiveness among 169 adolescents. The results confirmed earlier findings of no association between…

    11 ... 1 2 3 4 5 ...

    Related Papers

    Contagious Anxiety: Anxious European Americans Can Transmit Their Physiological Reactivity to African Americans

    Tessa V. West, K. Koslov, E. Page‐Gould, B. Major, W. Mendes

    Psychology

    Psychological science

    Source : www.semanticscholar.org

    Dr. Adolph ‘Doc’ Brown and Ronnie O. Rice address law enforcement preconceived biases in African Americans; advocate 3 Cs

    By Tanna M. Friday, sponsored content In July 2020, the Pew Research Center surveyed Americans’ attitudes toward law enforcement, race, and political persuasion, but the findings were significan

    Dr. Adolph ‘Doc’ Brown and Ronnie O. Rice address law enforcement preconceived biases in African Americans; advocate 3 Cs

    Posted By: Erica Thomas

    on: February 10, 2021

    In: Lifestyle, Local News

    PrintEmail

    By Tanna M. Friday, sponsored content

    In July 2020, the Pew Research Center surveyed Americans’ attitudes toward law enforcement, race, and political persuasion, but the findings were significantly skewed. The poll was conducted in June, shortly after the killing of George Floyd sparked nationwide protests over police brutality. The survey’s findings suggest that the opinions of the police are less favorable today than in 2016, when Pew conducted a similar poll showing that 68% of white Americans, 40% of Blacks and 59% of Hispanics had a favorable view.

    Only two-thirds who were surveyed rejected the notion of “qualified immunity,” where officers should be shielded from lawsuits unless they commit clear violations of the law. The majority, including 86% of Black respondents, 60% of whites, and 75% of Hispanics, agreed that “civilians need to have the power to sue law enforcement in order to hold them accountable for excessive use of force and misconduct.”

    The study also illustrates the perceptions of police tactics, courteousness, racial impartiality, and competency. Results show that the opinions vary by race, listing Black (31%) and Hispanic (42%) Americans as far less likely than white Americans (64%) to be highly confident in their local police departments to treat all racial groups equally.

    So, why are there preconceived biases in ideology and behavior among minorities?

    Birmingham attorney and motivational speaker, Ronnie O. Rice, started the conversation with The Trussville Tribune on the topic of how minorities should engage with law enforcement.

    “A lot times we hear what is going on with minorities, especially with Black males, when they are being pulled over or are engaged by law enforcement,” said Rice. “What are the things they are doing right or wrong? How did the opposing respond to the Capitol Hill situation versus the protests with color of skin? My goal is to provide relatable topics of conversations to the issues at hand while providing relatable solutions on how to respond to police.”

    Rice, along with educational leader, Clinical Psychologist, and social justice advocate, Dr. Adolph “Doc” Brown, share the legal and solid foundational perspective of minority interactions with law enforcement.

    “I have been studying this topic for over 30 years,” said Brown. “What is interesting is the background of a study I conducted which initially started with the topic of law enforcement perception of African American males, a psychophysiological perspective. We say psychophysiological perspective because anyone can do a pencil/paper test and the responses are often going to be as biased as our brain, but the moment you start including things like a lie detector test, blood pressure, skin response, and respiration, the body begins to listen to everything the mind says.”

    For the initial study, Brown shares, law enforcement officers were advised to be hooked up to the apparatus’ to show how their bodies responded during interactions with Black males versus white males. Unfortunately, no police precincts would allow Brown to perform this type of study. Instead, Brown conducted an inverse study that can be found in his 1997 psychology theses and dissertation titled ‘African American Males’ Perception of Law Enforcement: A Psychophysiological Perspective’.

    Brown examines a law enforcement stop in his study, described as a stereotype threat.

    “When law enforcement gets behind anyone’s car whether the person is black or white, everyone initially has a physiological spike,” said Brown. “Which is a natural or normalized reaction. What occurred in African American males was that the spike continued to rise. It wasn’t just law enforcement being behind them, it became, ‘Am I going to survive this encounter?’”

    Brown explains that the study was groundbreaking because it was almost halted due to physiological harm it was causing the participants.

    “The participants in the study were spiking off the charts,” explained Brown. “When this occurred I had to do some kind of intervention because of possible harm being caused to the participants. Furthermore, we had to perform relaxation imagery on the tail end of the study.”

    The study, Brown explains, is the show of what we have known for years. “How bias is translated into how we respond to our engagement,” he explained. “I have worked in conjunction with a retired police detective, James Thomas, together on this study for about thirty years. We have a real distinct way of helping people, particularly people of color, understand how to engage with law enforcement.”

    There are three Cs that Brown and Thomas advocate: Control, Comply, and Complain.

    “First, is control,” said Brown. “Control your mouth, behavior, sudden movement, and actions. Try to self-regulate and be as controlled as you can. Secondly, comply. The reason we say comply is because often times, law enforcement is giving commands. We say comply because street trials aren’t won on the street. Lastly, is complaint. We say complaint because if this officer does something that goes against professional standards, when you complain, you can help this officer have a file or record that provides a history of such that furthermore would not allow him to be in public safety.”

    Source : www.trussvilletribune.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 11 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer