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    according to the nhtsa what is the economic cost of crashes where at least one driver was distracted in 2010?

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    The Economic and Societal Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 2010 (Revised)

    The Economic and Societal Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 2010 (Revised)

    The Economic and Societal Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 2010 (Revised)

    In 2010, there were 32,999 people killed, 3.9 million were injured, and 24 million vehicles were damaged in motor vehicle crashes in the United States. The economic costs of these crashes totaled $277 billion. Included in these losses are lost productivity, medical costs, legal and court costs, emergency service costs (EMS), insurance administration costs, congestion costs, property damage, and workplace losses. The $277 billion cost of motor vehicle crashes represents the equivalent of nearly $897 for each of the 308.7 million people living in the United States, and 1.9 percent of the $14.96 trillion real U.S. Gross Domestic Product for 2010. These figures include both police-reported and unreported crashes. When quality of life valuations are considered, the total value of societal harm from motor vehicle crashes in 2010 was $871 billion. Lost market and household productivity accounted for $93 billion of the total $277 billion economic costs, while property damage accounted for $76 billion. Medical expenses totaled $35 billion. Congestion caused by crashes, including travel delay, excess fuel consumption, greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants accounted for $28 billion. Each fatality resulted in an average discounted lifetime cost of $1.4 million. Public revenues paid for roughly 9 percent of all motor vehicle crash costs, costing tax payers $24 billion in 2010, the equivalent of over $200 in added taxes for every household in the United States. Alcohol involved crashes accounted for $59 billion or 21 percent of all economic costs, and 84 percent of these costs occurred in crashes where a driver or non-occupant had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 grams per deciliter or greater. Alcohol was the cause of the crash in roughly 82 percent of these cases, causing $49 billion in costs. Crashes in which alcohol levels are BAC of .08 or higher are responsible for over 90 percent of the economic costs and societal harm that occurs in crashes attributable to alcohol use. Crashes in which police indicate that at least one driver was exceeding the legal speed limit or driving too fast for conditions cost $59 billion in 2010. Seat belt use prevented 12,500 fatalities, 308,000 serious injuries, and $69 billion in injury related costs in 2010, but the failure of a substantial portion of the driving population to buckle up caused 3,350 unnecessary fatalities, 54,300 serious injuries, and cost society $14 billion in easily preventable injury related costs. Crashes in which at least one driver was identified as being distracted cost $46 billion in 2010. The report also includes data on the costs associated with motorcycle crashes, failure to wear motorcycle helmets, pedestrian crash, bicyclist crashes, and numerous different roadway designation crashes.

    Record URL:

    http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812013.pdf

    Supplemental Notes:

    The Economic and Societal Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes was originally published in May 2014. Subsequent to its publication, a coding error was discovered in the SAS program that was used to aggregate costs to persons with multiple injuries. This error impacted estimates of medical care costs, lost work and household productivity, and insurance administrative and legal costs. After evaluating the potential impact of this error, the authors determined that it was large enough to warrant a revision to the base report. This revised report thus replaces the May 2014 report in its entirety.

    Corporate Authors:

    National Center for Statistics and Analysis

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE

    Washington, DC  United States  20590

    Authors:

    Blincoe, Lawrence Miller, Ted R Zaloshnja, Eduard Lawrence, Bruce A

    Publication Date: 2015-5

    Language

    English

    Media Info

    Media Type: Digital/otherEdition: Technical ReportFeatures: Appendices; Figures; References; Tables;Pagination: 304p

    Subject/Index Terms

    TRT Terms: Blood alcohol levels; Costs; Distraction; Economic impacts; Motor vehicles; Motorcycle crashes; Seat belt use; Social impacts; Speeding; Traffic crashesGeographic Terms: United StatesSubject Areas: Economics; Highways; Safety and Human Factors; I10: Economics and Administration; I80: Accident Studies;

    Filing Info

    Accession Number: 01530004Record Type: PublicationReport/Paper Numbers: DOT HS 812 013Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOTCreated Date: Jun 3 2014 1:06PM

    Source : trid.trb.org

    NHTSA calculates US motor vehicle crashes in 2010 cost $871B in economic loss and societal harm

    The US Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a new study that finds the price tag for motor vehicle crashes in the US in 2010 carried a cost of $871 billion in economic loss and societal harm. This includes $277 billion in economic costs—nearly $900 for...

    NHTSA calculates US motor vehicle crashes in 2010 cost $871B in economic loss and societal harm

    30 May 2014

    The US Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a new study that finds the price tag for motor vehicle crashes in the US in 2010 carried a cost of $871 billion in economic loss and societal harm. This includes $277 billion in economic costs—nearly $900 for each person living in the United States based on calendar year 2010 data—and $594 billion in harm from the loss of life and the pain and decreased quality of life due to injuries.

    The economic cost of motor vehicle crashes in the US is the equivalent of 1.9% of the $14.96 trillion Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2010. Factors contributing to the price tag include productivity losses, property damage, medical and rehabilitation costs, congestion costs, legal and court costs, emergency services, insurance administration costs, and the costs to employers, among others.

    Some 3.9 million people were injured in 13.6 million motor vehicle crashes in 2010, including 32,999 fatalities. 24% of these injuries occurred in crashes that were not reported to police. About 23.9 million vehicles were damaged in motor vehicle crashes in 2010; 18.5 million or 77% of these vehicles were damaged in incidents that incurred property damage only. The remaining 23% involved injuries to occupants of the vehicle, or to non-occupants such as pedestrians or bicyclists.

    The lifetime economic cost to society for each fatality is $1.4 million. More than 90% of this amount is attributable to lost workplace and household productivity and legal costs. Each critically injured survivor (using the MAIS 5 scale) cost an average of $1.1 million. Medical costs and lost productivity accounted for 82% of the cost for this most serious level of non-fatal injury.

    Lost workplace productivity costs totaled $70.2 billion, which equaled 25% of the total costs. Lost household productivity totaled $22.9 billion, representing 8% of the total economic costs.

    Overall, nearly 75% of these costs are paid through taxes, insurance premiums, and congestion related costs such as travel delay, excess fuel consumption, and increased environmental impacts. These costs, borne by society rather than individual crash victims, totaled more than $200 billion.

    NHTSA last examined the cost of motor vehicle crashes in 2002, based on 2000 data, and came up with an estimate of $230.6 billion; the current estimate thus indicates an approximately 20% increase.

    NHTSA’s new study, cites several behavioral factors as contributing to the huge price-tag of roadway crashes based on the 32,999 fatalities, 3.9 million non-fatal injuries, and 24 million damaged vehicles that took place in 2010. Key findings include:

    Drunk Driving: Crashes caused by drivers under the influence of alcohol accounted for 18% of the total economic loss due to motor vehicle crashes and cost the nation $49 billion—an average cost of $158 for every person in the US. Including lost quality of life, these crashes were responsible for $199 billion or 23% of the overall societal harm caused by motor vehicle crashes. More than 90% of these costs occurred in crashes involving a drunk driver with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.Speeding: Crashes involving a speeding vehicle traveling over the posted speed limit or too fast for conditions accounted for 21% of the total economic loss and cost the nation $59 billion in 2010, an average cost of $191 for every person in the US. Including lost quality of life, these crashes were responsible for $210 billion or 24% of the overall societal harm caused by motor vehicle crashes.Distraction: Crashes involving a distracted driver accounted for 17% of the total economic loss and cost the nation $46 billion in 2010, an average cost of $148 for every person in the US. Including lost quality of life, these crashes were responsible for $129 billion or 15% of the overall societal harm caused by motor vehicle crashes.Pedestrians and Bicyclists: Crashes involving pedestrians and bicyclists accounted for 7% of the total economic loss and cost the nation $19 billion in 2010. Including lost quality of life, these crashes were responsible for $90 billion or 10% of the overall societal harm caused by motor vehicle crashes.Seatbelts: Seatbelt use prevented $69 billion in medical care, lost productivity, and other injury related costs. Conversely, preventable fatalities and injuries to unbelted occupants accounted for 5% of the total economic loss and cost the nation $14 billion in 2010. Including lost quality of life, failure to wear seatbelts caused $72 billion or 8% of the overall societal harm caused by motor vehicle crashes.

    Posted on 30 May 2014 in Brief | Permalink | Comments (16)

    Comments

    This is another reason we need Google's autonomous vehicles to take care of door to door transportation of humans, pets and packages. Can't wait to see Google launch this service. It will really be disruptive for not just the automotive industry but also taxi's and public transportation in general.

    The autonomous vehicle could transport people and stuff 24/7 all year round so the vehicle cost can be very low per mile driven and made as BEVs the fuel cost will also be very low. Also a 100 miles electric range will be plenty for most autonomous vehicles as you can always pick up another vehicle with a fresh battery if you need to go longer. 40 million autonomous vehicles operated as fleet services by Google, Tesla, Amazon and others would probably be enough to do all person transportation in the US and much goods delivery. And it would guarantee you could pick one vehicle up within 2 minutes using your smart phone wherever you are in an environment where people live or work.

    Source : www.greencarcongress.com

    NHTSA: Distracted Driving Crashes Cost Americans $129 Billion a Year

    The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a new study that points to the high economic toll and societal impact of motor vehicle crashes in the United States [....]

    NHTSA: Distracted Driving Crashes Cost Americans $129 Billion A Year

    HOMEDISTRACTED DRIVING RESEARCHNHTSA: DISTRACTED DRIVING CRASHES COST AMERICANS $129 BILLION A YEAR

    NHTSA: Distracted Driving Crashes Cost Americans $129 Billion a Year

    03 Jun

    by Dianne Anderson | Distracted Driving Research, Distracted Driving Updates

    The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a new study that points to the high economic toll and societal impact of motor vehicle crashes in the United States. The study, The Economic and Societal Impact Of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 2010, (DOT HS 812 013 , May 2014), places a total  price tag of $871 billion in economic loss and societal harm caused by crashes. Distracted driving (which we know is vastly under-reported) accounts for $129 billion, or 15 percent of the overall societal harm caused by motor vehicle crashes.

    The study was broken down into 5 categories as contributing to this distressing price tag –  drunk driving, speeding, distracted driving, pedestrians and bicyclists, and seat belt usage. The costs included calculation of items such as productivity losses, property damage, medical and rehabilitation costs, congestion costs, legal and court costs, emergency services, insurance administration costs, and the costs to employers.

    “No amount of money can replace the life of a loved one, or stem the suffering associated with motor vehicle crashes,” said U.S. Secretary of Transportation, Anthony Foxx. “While the economic and societal costs of crashes are staggering, today’s report clearly demonstrates that investments in safety are worth every penny used to reduce the frequency and severity of these tragic events.”

    Tags: Anthony Foxx,Economic Toll,National Highway Traffic Safety Administration,Nhtsa

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