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    a way to remember the questions to ask when taking a brief history is to use the acronym sample. what does the s in sample stand for?

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    SAMPLE history

    SAMPLE history

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    SAMPLE history is a mnemonic acronym to remember key questions for a person's medical assessment.[1] The SAMPLE history is sometimes used in conjunction with vital signs and OPQRST. The questions are most commonly used in the field of emergency medicine by first responders during the secondary assessment. It is used for alert people, but often much of this information can also be obtained from the family or friend of an unresponsive person. In the case of severe trauma, this portion of the assessment is less important. A derivative of SAMPLE history is AMPLE history which places a greater emphasis on a person's medical history.[2]

    Contents

    1 Meaning 2 See also 3 References 4 External links

    Meaning[edit]

    The parts of the mnemonic are:

    S – Signs/Symptoms (Symptoms are important but they are subjective.)

    A – Allergies M – Medications

    P – Past Pertinent medical history

    L – Last Oral Intake (Sometimes also Last Menstrual Cycle.)

    E – Events Leading Up To Present Illness / Injury

    See also[edit]

    OPQRST DCAP-BTLS ABC (medicine)

    Past Medical History

    References[edit]

    ^ Ed Dickinson; Dan Limmer; O'Keefe, Michael F.; Grant, Harvey D.; Bob Murray (2008). . Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice Hall. p. 242. ISBN 0-13-500524-8.^ Marx, J (2010). . Philadelphia: Mosby/Elsevier. pp. 267. ISBN 978-0-323-05472-0.

    External links[edit]

    Understanding the SAMPLE History at the Wayback Machine (archived April 22, 2018)

    show vte First aid show vte

    Medical examination and history taking

    show vte

    Medical mnemonics (list)

    Categories: Emergency medical servicesFirst aidMedical mnemonicsMnemonic acronyms

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Past the A.B.C.'s of First Aid you have S.A.M.P.L.E., to ask and a few more items!

    When it comes’s first aid incidents in the workplace some are incredibly simple and other put ALL OF YOUR BRAIN POWER and KNOWLEDGE to work when seconds count. In truth you can be thinking of over 38 things at one time!   But before you get crazy and ask did you have the CLAP in mind! And because y

    Past the A.B.C.'s of First Aid you have S.A.M.P.L.E., to ask and a few more items!

    Terry Penney

    Terry Penney

    Senior OH&S and Env. & Reg., Professional, Presenter, Motivational Safety Speaker and Safety Program Development.

    Published Mar 5, 2017

    + Follow

    When it comes’s first aid incidents in the workplace some are incredibly simple and other put ALL OF YOUR BRAIN POWER and KNOWLEDGE to work when seconds count. In truth you can be thinking of over 38 things at one time!

    But before you get crazy and ask did you have the CLAP in mind! And because your location YOU MAYBE with your patient for a while until help arrives you must always be thinking! PLEASE REMEMBER AFTER THE CLAP if you don’t call for help or do the A B C’s in life the rest of you training is not worth horse muffins in life!

    And like most of us in life we re-train every three years as we whine all the way to class, but those neat little learning acronym we learned in life are sometimes long and forgotten, hence did you cover them in a tool box meeting! Plus Oh yes don’t forget the first aid record book and data a noted by legislation!

    First aid is as easy as ABC – airway, breathing and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In any situation, apply the DRSABCD Action Plan. DRSABCD stands for: Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person.

    SAMPLE” is a first aid mnemonic acronym used for a person's medical assessment. ... The questions that are asked to the patient include Signs & Symptoms, Allergies, Medications, Past medical history, Last oral intake, and Events leading up to present injury (SAMPLE).

    SAMPLE history is an mnemonic acronym to remember key questions for a person's medical assessment. The SAMPLE history is sometimes used in conjunction with vital signs and OPQRST. The questions are most commonly used in the field of emergency medicine by first responders during the secondary assessment.  “SAMPLE”:

    S – Signs and Symptoms – By asking the question “What seems to be bothering you?” a rescuer can get the answers from his or her victim.

    A – Allergies – Allergies play a significant role in first aid emergencies. Rescuers can ask “Do you have any allergies I should know about?” to determine the answer to this question. More advanced rescuers can ask questions pertaining to medical allergies.

    M – Medication – A victim forgetting to take his or her medication or a victim that carries a certain type of medication (ex: Nitro for Heart Attacks), can help a rescuer determine the problem. A simple question of “Are you on any medication?” can help a rescuer obtain the information from the victim.

    P – Past Pertinent History – This part of the acronym, usually confused with the E (which you’ll find out about soon), is associated with finding out whether this has happened to the victim in the past. If these symptoms are re-occuring the victim can help by telling what the cause was in the previous circumstance. A simple question of “Has this happened to you before?” can aid in retrieving this information from the victim.

    L – Last Meal – Past meal time can help in determine if the victim might be suffering from a number of issues, with a likely scenario being low blood sugar. In this circumstance the victim might need to increase blood sugar. A good question to ask would be “When was your last meal” or “Did you have breakfast/lunch/dinner?”

    E – Events Prior to – Not to be confused with past pertinent history, this final letter in the acronym is associated with what the victim was doing prior to the first aid emergency. An example of the how this part of the acronym apply’s can be in the role of excessive exercise to a an “out-of-shape” victim which can have a number of effects. A good question in this circumstance is “What were you doing before this happened?”

    Plus DO NOT FORGET THE “LOCPRESS” is an acronym used after the primary survey, history check and the head-to-toe have been completed in order to receive more information about the victims condition and to uncover any new injuries or conditions. During this portion fo the secondary survey, the rescuer(s) will monitor the vital signs of the victim periodically (every 5 to 10 minutes) while treating any discovered injuries. Rescuers will be on alret for sounds, odours, colores, rates and rhythms and temperature shifts. The five vital signs that rescuers will be monitoring is level of consciousness, breathing, pulse, skin temperature, and pupils. A good method of remembering the vitals to monitor is by using an acronym called “LOCPRESS”. “LOCPRESS” stands for:

    Source : www.linkedin.com

    What does SAMPLE stand for in first aid?

    The acronym SAMPLE can be used in the assessment of all patients but it is especially helpful when dealing with medical patients. SAMPLE is taught on a wide variety of first aid, EMT and lifeguarding

    What does SAMPLE stand for in first aid?

    BY JOHN FURST · PUBLISHED MAY 29, 2015 · UPDATED DECEMBER 6, 2015

    94 SHARES Share Tweet

    The acronym SAMPLE can be used in the assessment of all patients but it is especially helpful when dealing with medical patients. SAMPLE is taught on a wide variety of first aid, EMT and lifeguarding courses. So what does it stand for?

    Signs and symptoms

    A sign is something you as a first aider observe (ie, see with your own eyes!) or record. For example, a patient suffering a heart attack may be very pale and sweaty.

    A symptom is something the patient feels and tells you about, such as dizziness or chest pain.

    Allergies

    Ask if the patient has ever had any allergic reactions to any medications. Also enquire about environmental allergies, for example food and insect stings.

    Medications

    Ask if the patient takes any prescription medicines. This can sometimes give you an indication of a possible medical problem and a new line of questioning.

    Past medical history

    Ask about relevant medical history. Obtaining an in-depth history may sometimes not be necessary but information such as two heart attacks last year and a coronary bypass three weeks ago is essential.

    Last oral intake

    Ask about the patient’s last intake of food and drink, this is especially important if the condition could be caused by food or drink.

    Events leading up to the illness or injury

    What happened in the time leading up to the injury or illness?

    Want to learn more about first aid? Why not sign up to one of our free online first aid courses!

    Source : www.firstaidforfree.com

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