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    a peak in which national park was renamed first peoples mountain?

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    Yellowstone renames mountain linked to massacre of Native Americans

    Peak renamed First Peoples Mountain was known as Mount Doane after Gustavus Doane who helmed an attack that killed at least 173 people in 1870

    Native Americans

    Yellowstone renames mountain linked to massacre of Native Americans

    Peak renamed First Peoples Mountain was known as Mount Doane after Gustavus Doane who led attack that killed 173 people in 1870

    Victoria Bekiempis

    Tue 14 Jun 2022 16.08 BST

    Yellowstone national park has renamed the peak that was once known as Mount Doane to First Peoples Mountain, in a decision to strip from the famed wildlands an “offensive name” evoking the murders of nearly 200 Native Americans, officials said.

    In a 9 June announcement, National Park Service authorities also said they might weigh similar renamings in the future.

    The 10,551-ft mountain had been named after Gustavus Doane, a US army captain. Doane was a “key member” of an 1870 expedition before Yellowstone became the country’s first national park, authorities said.

    Native Americans are at the heart of Yellowstone. After 150 years, they are finally being heard

    Read more

    But earlier the same year of the expedition, Doane helmed an attack on a band of Piegan Blackfeet in retaliation for the purported murder of a white furrier. This assault, now known as the Marias Massacre, resulted in the killing of at least 173 Native Americans, authorities said.

    The victims included numerous women, elders and children who contracted smallpox. “Doane wrote fondly about this attack and bragged about it for the rest of his life,” the National Park Service said.

    The new First Peoples name was “based on recommendations from the Rocky Mountain Tribal Council, subsequent votes within the Wyoming Board of Geographic names, and [support] of the National Park Service,” officials added. These entities ultimately forwarded this name to the US Board on Geographic Names this month.

    That board, which is responsible for maintaining uniformity in geographic name usage across the federal government, voted 15-0 to affirm the renaming, officials said. Yellowstone recently reached out to the 27 tribes associated with the park and “received no opposition to the change nor concerns”.

    “Yellowstone may consider changes to other derogatory or inappropriate names in the future,” officials also said in their announcement.

    This renaming comes as the US Department of the Interior ramps up efforts to rename hundreds of geographic formations deemed to be offensively titled. The interior secretary, Deb Haaland, the first Native American to hold a cabinet secretary position, issued an order in November 2021 that officially declared “squaw” to be a “derogatory” word.

    Haaland’s order required that the Board of Geographic Names come up with a process to remove that word from federal use. The department, in February of this year, released a list of potential replacement names for more than 660 geographic sites which included the word.

    She also issued an order that created a federal advisory committee “to broadly solicit, review, and recommend changes to other derogatory geographic and federal land unit names”.

    “Words matter, particularly in our work to make our nation’s public lands and waters accessible and welcoming to people of all backgrounds,” Haaland said. “Consideration of these replacements is a big step forward in our efforts to remove derogatory terms whose expiration dates are long overdue.”

    The renaming of geographic formations comes amid a push to remove Confederate symbols across the US in the wake of George Floyd’s murder in May 2020. More than 200 Confederate monuments and memorials have been renamed, removed, or relocated, according to the New York Times.

    Topics Native Americans National parks news Reuse this content

    Source : www.theguardian.com

    Yellowstone National Park Renames Peak “First Peoples Mountain”

    The 10,551-foot peak, formerly called Doane Mountain, has a new title that reflects the contributions of Native Americans

    Yellowstone National Park Renames Peak “First Peoples Mountain”

    The 10,551-foot peak, formerly called Doane Mountain, has a new title that reflects the contributions of Native Americans

    Frederick Dreier

    Jun 14, 2022

    Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition, and adventure courses and more than 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+.

    Yellowstone National Park has taken a step to distance itself from its painful past.

    On Thursday, the National Park Service officially changed the name of a 10,551-foot peak east of Yellowstone Lake to First Peoples Mountain, after research showed that the man it was previously named for participated in atrocities against Native Americans. The name change was confirmed following a unanimous 15–0 vote by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names.

    “It is a victory, yes. Is history being rewritten and retold truthfully? I hope so,” William Snell, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council, told National Public Radio.

    The mountain was formerly named Doane Mountain after U.S. Army Captain Gutavus Doane, who participated in the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition to explore Yellowstone in 1870. Earlier that year, Doane had led an attack against the Piegan Blackfeet Tribe that was later labeled the Marias Massacre. At least 173 Native Americans were killed in the attack, including elderly people, children, and women, according to the NPS.

    “Doane wrote fondly about this attack and bragged about it for the rest of his life,” read a press release from the NPS. Later in his life, Doane also tried and failed to become superintendent of the park, according to Montana State University.

    Blackfeet member Tom Rodgers told CNN that the Indigenous community has petitioned the park to change the name for years.

    “It has taken far too long for this journey of healing to arrive,” he said.

    The mountain’s new name is part of a wider push to recognize the contributions of Native Americans, and to do away with names and titles associated with racist terminology or acts of violence on American history. In November, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland established a process for reviewing and replacing derogatory names on federal land, starting with the term “squaw.” Since then, multiple states have renamed geologic features with titles that honor Native Americans. In December, Colorado officially renamed a prominent peak near Denver Mestaa’ehehe Mountain.

    According to the NPS, Yellowstone officials spoke with 27 associated tribes in the leadup to the name change and received no opposition to the new title.

    “We all agreed on ‘First Peoples’ Mountain’ as an appropriate name to honor the victims of such inhumane acts of genocide, and to also remind people of the 10,000-year-plus connection tribal peoples have to this sacred place now called Yellowstone,” said Piikani Nation Chief Stan Grier in a statement.

    Filed to: Yellowstone National Park

    Lead Photo: National Park Service

    Source : www.outsideonline.com

    Yellowstone National Park Renames Peak “First Peoples Mountain”

    The 10,551-foot peak, formerly called Doane Mountain, has a new title that reflects the contributions of Native Americans The 10,551-foot peak, formerly called Doane Mountain, has a new title that reflects the contributions of Native Americans

    Yellowstone National Park Renames Peak “First Peoples Mountain”

    Frederick Dreier

    Tue, June 14, 2022, 1:00 PM·2 min read

    This article originally appeared on Outside

    Yellowstone National Park has taken a step to distance itself from its painful past.

    On Thursday, the National Park Service officially changed the name of a 10,551-foot peak east of Yellowstone Lake to First Peoples Mountain, after research showed that the man it was previously named for participated in atrocities against Native Americans. The name change was confirmed following a unanimous 15-0 vote by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names.

    "It is a victory, yes. Is history being rewritten and retold truthfully? I hope so," William Snell, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council, told National Public Radio.

    The mountain was formerly named Doane Mountain after U.S. Army Captain Gutavus Doane, who participated in the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition to explore Yellowstone in 1870. Earlier that year, Doane had led an attack against the Piegan Blackfeet Tribe that was later labeled the Marias Massacre. At least 173 Native Americans were killed in the attack, including elderly people, children, and women, according to the NPS.

    "Doane wrote fondly about this attack and bragged about it for the rest of his life," read a press release from the NPS. Later in his life, Doane also tried and failed to become superintendent of the park, according to Montana State University.

    Blackfeet member Tom Rodgers told CNN that the Indigenous community has petitioned the park to change the name for years.

    "It has taken far too long for this journey of healing to arrive," he said.

    The mountain's new name is part of a wider push to recognize the contributions of Native Americans, and to do away with names and titles associated with racist terminology or acts of violence on American history. In November, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland established a process for reviewing and replacing derogatory names on federal land, starting with the term "squaw." Since then, multiple states have renamed geologic features with titles that honor Native Americans. In December, Colorado officially renamed a prominent peak near Denver Mestaa'ehehe Mountain.

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