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    a major reason leaders such as jefferson wanted a strong central government was their experiences with great britain’s monarchy.

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    Government Chapter 2 Test Review

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    History

    12th

    12th Government Chapter 2 Test Review

    Mrs. Mudd 34 plays

    40 Qs

    Show Answers See Preview 1. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    The Judeo-Christian concept of an agreement between man and God influenced the early colonists' views of the role of government.

    answer choices true false 2. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    The colonists were familiar with representative government from Britain's Parliament.

    answer choices true false 3. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Pilgrim leaders wrote the Mayflower Compact to provide rules for governing themselves.

    answer choices true false 4. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    In colonial charters, all the power of the government was given to the governor.

    answer choices true false 5. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    While women could not vote, most colonies allowed all adult white men to vote.

    answer choices true false 6. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Colonists valued limited government because they

    answer choices

    believed monarchs should have absolute power over their people.

    did not accept the concept of a representative government.

    thought people should be protected from punishment by an unjust government.

    thought that order could be maintained without a government.

    7. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    What document stated that monarchs could not interfere with parliamentary elections?

    answer choices

    the English Bill of Rights

    the Magna Carta the New Testament the Old Testament 8. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Which of John Locke's beliefs had a major influence on the colonists?

    answer choices

    All people have certain "natural" or inalienable rights such as the right to liberty.

    Monarchs are appointed by God and should have supreme power.

    People need government to maintain order and prevent conflict.

    The powers of government must be separated.

    9. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    The Connecticut Charter set up a representative government because it

    answer choices

    established the governor as the king's agent in the colony.

    gave people the right to elect the governor and judges.

    allowed for taxation without the consent of the people.

    stated that all colonists had the right to vote.

    10. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    By 1776, the colonial governments

    answer choices

    accepted the king as head of the church

    had significant experience in representative government.

    primarily practiced direct democracy for all citizens.

    were virtually identical to one another.

    11. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    The colonists used word-of-mouth and printing to share the events leading to the Declaration of Independence; today we could use technologies such as e-mail to accomplish this task.

    answer choices true false 12. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Because of what they saw as unfair taxation, colonists stopped buying British goods.

    answer choices true false 13. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Britain reacted to the First Continental Congress by weakening its control over the colonies.

    answer choices true false 14. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Following the Declaration of Independence, the Second Continential Congress instructed the staes to begin writing constitutions.

    answer choices true false 15. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Many people believe the inalienable rights set forth in the Declaration of Independence are not human-made, but come from higher powers.

    answer choices true false 16. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    Leaders such as Thomas Jefferson formed committees of correspondence that

    answer choices

    began writing a national constitution

    established colonial legislatures

    sent soldiers to fight in the French and Indian War

    urged resistance to the British

    17. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    After considerable discussion, the First Continental Congress

    answer choices

    decided to go to war against the British

    established a central government and chose John Hancock as its preseident

    imposed an embargo on Britain.

    instructed the colonies to create written constitutions

    18. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    When the Declaration of Independence states it is drawing on "the Laws of Nature and Nature's God," it is expressing an idea that primarily originated with

    answer choices George Washington John Locke Richard Henry Lee Samuel Adams 19. Multiple-choice 1 minute 5 pts Q.

    The Declaration of Independence states that governments

    answer choices

    can establish standing armies without the consent of the legislatures.

    Source : quizizz.com

    Quiz 2

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like leaders such as Thomas Jefferson formed committees of correspondence that..., After considerable discussion, the First Continental Congress..., When the Declaration of Independence states it is drawing on "the Laws of Nature and Nature's God" is it expressing an idea that primarily originated from... and more.

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    leaders such as Thomas Jefferson formed committees of correspondence that...

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    Urged resistance to the British

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    After considerable discussion, the First Continental Congress...

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    Imposed an embargo on Britain

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    1/20 Created by chl0eee

    Terms in this set (20)

    leaders such as Thomas Jefferson formed committees of correspondence that...

    Urged resistance to the British

    After considerable discussion, the First Continental Congress...

    Imposed an embargo on Britain

    When the Declaration of Independence states it is drawing on "the Laws of Nature and Nature's God" is it expressing an idea that primarily originated from...

    John Locke

    The Declaration of Independence states that governments...

    Derive their powers from the consent of the governed

    In 1776, states began creating written constitutions because they...

    They knew that once they were independent, they needed orderly government

    The colonists used word of mouth and printing to share the events leading to the declaration of Independence, today we could use technologies such as e-mail to accomplish this task.

    True

    Because of what you as unfair taxation, colonists stopped buying British goods.

    True

    British reacted to the First Continental Congress by weakening its control over the colonies.

    False

    Following the Declaration of Independence, the Second Continental Congress instructed the states to begin writing constitutions.

    True

    Many people believe the inalienable rights set forth in the Declaration of Independence are no human-made, but come from higher powers.

    True

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    Verified questions

    US GOVERNMENT

    Why do you think state constitutions have been revised so frequently, compared with the U.S. Constitution?

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    Should searches of motor vehicles require police to have a warrant? Why or why not?

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    Analyze Information The United States pursued an isolationist foreign policy for its first 150 years as a nation. For what reasons was this approach a reasonable one at the time? ? Give evidence to support your answer.

    Verified answer US GOVERNMENT

    Analyze Unitary Government Analyze advantages and disadvantages of a unitary system of government. Use valid primary and secondary sources to write a paragraph analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of a unitary government. Consider the following questions : What is a unitary government? What structures within a unitary government hold the power? How does a unitary government help its citizens? How does a unitary government limit its citizens?

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    What type of political culture does Texas have—according to Daniel Elazar?

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    Levi Jarrad (R) was appointed US Postmaster for New Brunswick, NJ by President Chester A. Arthur (R) in 1881.He was sentenced to 10 years in prison for forgery in 1884

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    The Declaration of Independence is based on the same ideals as the Mayflower Compact

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    For the size of the country's population, the United States has the fewest lobbyists in the federal capital compared to the major capitals of Western Europe. True or False

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    Source : quizlet.com

    Milestones: 1776–1783

    history.state.gov 3.0 shell

    Home Milestones 1776-1783 Articles of Confederation, 1777–1781

    MILESTONES: 1776–1783

    NOTE TO READERS

    “Milestones in the History of U.S. Foreign Relations” has been retired and is no longer maintained. For more information, please see the full notice.

    Articles of Confederation, 1777–1781

    The Articles of Confederation served as the written document that established the functions of the national government of the United States after it declared independence from Great Britain. It established a weak central government that mostly, but not entirely, prevented the individual states from conducting their own foreign diplomacy.

    The Articles of Confederation

    The Albany Plan an earlier, pre-independence attempt at joining the colonies into a larger union, had failed in part because the individual colonies were concerned about losing power to another central insitution. As the American Revolution gained momentum, however, many political leaders saw the advantages of a centralized government that could coordinate the Revolutionary War. In June of 1775, the New York provincial Congress sent a plan of union to the Continental Congress, which, like the Albany Plan, continued to recognize the authority of the British Crown.

    Some Continental Congress delegates had also informally discussed plans for a more permanent union than the Continental Congress, whose status was temporary. Benjamin Franklin had drawn up a plan for “Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.” While some delegates, such as Thomas Jefferson, supported Franklin’s proposal, many others were strongly opposed. Franklin introduced his plan before Congress on July 21, but stated that it should be viewed as a draft for when Congress was interested in reaching a more formal proposal. Congress tabled the plan.

    Following the Declaration of Independence, the members of the Continental Congress realized it would be necessary to set up a national government. Congress began to discuss the form this government would take on July 22, disagreeing on a number of issues, including whether representation and voting would be proportional or state-by-state. The disagreements delayed final discussions of confederation until October of 1777. By then, the British capture of Philadelphia had made the issue more urgent. Delegates finally formulated the Articles of Confederation, in which they agreed to state-by-state voting and proportional state tax burdens based on land values, though they left the issue of state claims to western lands unresolved. Congress sent the Articles to the states for ratification at the end of November. Most delegates realized that the Articles were a flawed compromise, but believed that it was better than an absence of formal national government.

    On December 16, 1777, Virginia was the first state to ratify. Other states ratified during the early months of 1778. When Congress reconvened in June of 1778, the delegates learned that Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey refused to ratify the Articles. The Articles required unanimous approval from the states. These smaller states wanted other states to relinquish their western land claims before they would ratify the Articles. New Jersey and Delaware eventually agreed to the conditions of the Articles, with New Jersey ratifying on Nov 20, 1778, and Delaware on Feb 1, 1779. This left Maryland as the last remaining holdout.

    Irked by Maryland’s recalcitrance, several other state governments passed resolutions endorsing the formation of a national government without the state of Maryland, but other politicians such as Congressman Thomas Burke of North Carolina persuaded their governments to refrain from doing so, arguing that without unanimous approval of the new Confederation, the new country would remain weak, divided, and open to future foreign intervention and manipulation.

    Meanwhile, in 1780, British forces began to conduct raids on Maryland communities in the Chesapeake Bay. Alarmed, the state government wrote to the French minister Anne-César De la Luzerne asking for French naval assistance. Luzerne wrote back, urging the government of Maryland to ratify the Articles of Confederation. Marylanders were given further incentive to ratify when Virginia agreed to relinquish its western land claims, and so the Maryland legislature ratified the Articles of Confederation on March 1, 1781.

    French minister Anne-César De la Luzerne

    The Continental Congress voted on Jan 10, 1781, to establish a Department of Foreign Affairs; on Aug 10 of that year, it elected Robert R. Livingston as Secretary of Foreign Affairs. The Secretary’s duties involved corresponding with U.S. representatives abroad and with ministers of foreign powers. The Secretary was also charged with transmitting Congress’ instructions to U.S. agents abroad and was authorized to attend sessions of Congress. A further Act of Feb 22, 1782, allowed the Secretary to ask and respond to questions during sessions of the Continental Congress.

    The Articles created a sovereign, national government, and, as such, limited the rights of the states to conduct their own diplomacy and foreign policy. However, this proved difficult to enforce, as the national government could not prevent the state of Georgia from pursuing its own independent policy regarding Spanish Florida, attempting to occupy disputed territories and threatening war if Spanish officials did not work to curb Indian attacks or refrain from harboring escaped slaves. Nor could the Confederation government prevent the landing of convicts that the British Government continued to export to its former colonies. In addition, the Articles did not allow Congress sufficient authority to enforce provisions of the 1783 Treaty of Paris that allowed British creditors to sue debtors for pre-Revolutionary debts, an unpopular clause that many state governments chose to ignore. Consequently, British forces continued to occupy forts in the Great Lakes region. These problems, combined with the Confederation government’s ineffectual response to Shays’ Rebellion in Massachusetts, convinced national leaders that a more powerful central government was necessary. This led to the Constitutional Convention that formulated the current Constitution of the United States.

    Source : history.state.gov

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