if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    _____ is a general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one’s job.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get _____ is a general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one’s job. from EN Bilgi.

    Module 12.2: Stressors: PSY 200 CN13

    Module 12.2: Stressors

    For an individual to experience stress, he must first encounter a potential stressor. In general, stressors can be placed into one of two broad categories: chronic and acute.

    Chronic stressors include events that persist over an extended period of time.

    Acute stressors involve brief focal events that sometimes continue to be experienced as overwhelming well after the event has ended.

    Whether chronic or acute, potential stressors come in many shapes and sizes. They can include major traumatic events, significant life changes, daily hassles, as well as other situations in which a person is regularly exposed to threat, challenge, or danger.

    Traumatic Events

    Some stressors involve traumatic events or situations in which a person is exposed to actual or potential death or serious injury. Stressors in this category include exposure to military combat, threatened or actual physical assaults (e.g., physical attacks, sexual assault, robbery, childhood abuse), terrorist attacks, natural disasters (e.g., earthquakes, floods, hurricanes), and automobile accidents. Men, non-Whites, and individuals in lower socioeconomic status (SES) groups report experiencing a greater number of traumatic events than do women, Whites, and individuals in higher SES groups. Some individuals who are exposed to stressors of extreme magnitude develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a chronic stress reaction characterized by experiences and behaviors that may include intrusive and painful memories of the stressor event, jumpiness, persistent negative emotional states, detachment from others, angry outbursts, and avoidance of reminders of the event. PTSD will be covered in greater detail in the next lesson.

    Life Changes

    Figure 12.9 Some fairly typical life events, such as moving, can be significant stressors. Even when the move is intentional and positive, the amount of resulting change in daily life can cause stress. (credit: "Jellaluna"/Flickr)

    Most stressors that we encounter are not nearly as intense as the ones described above. Many potential stressors we face involve events or situations that require us to make changes in our ongoing lives and require time as we adjust to those changes. Examples include death of a close family member, marriage, divorce, and moving (Figure 12.9).

    In the 1960s, psychiatrists Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe wanted to examine the link between life stressors and physical illness, based on the hypothesis that life events requiring significant changes in a person's normal life routines are stressful, whether these events are desirable or undesirable. They developed the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS), consisting of 43 life events that require varying degrees of personal readjustment. Many life events that most people would consider pleasant (e.g., holidays, retirement, marriage) are among those listed on the SRRS; these are examples of eustress. Holmes and Rahe also proposed that life events can add up over time, and that experiencing a cluster of stressful events increases one's risk of developing physical illnesses.

    In developing their scale, Holmes and Rahe asked 394 participants to provide a numerical estimate for each of the 43 items; each estimate corresponded to how much readjustment participants felt each event would require. These estimates resulted in mean value scores for each event—often called life change units (LCUs). The numerical scores ranged from 11 to 100, representing the perceived magnitude of life change each event entails. Agreement on the amount of adjustment required by the various life events on the SRRS is highly consistent, even cross-culturally.

    Table 12.1 Some Stressors on the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (Holmes & Rahe, 1967)

    Life Event Life Change Units

    Death of a spouse 100

    Divorce 73

    Death of a close family member 63

    Personal injury or illness 53

    Marriage 50

    Dismissal from work 47

    Change in financial state 38

    Change to different line of work 36

    Outstanding personal achievement 28

    Beginning or ending school 26

    Change in living conditions 25

    Change in working hours or conditions 20

    Change in residence 20

    Change is schools 20

    Change in social activities 18

    Change in sleeping habits 16

    Change in eating habits 15

    Vacation 13

    Minor violation of the law 11

    Extensive research has demonstrated that accumulating a high number of life change units within a brief period of time (one or two years) is related to a wide range of physical illnesses (even accidents and athletic injuries) and mental health problems. In addition, people tend to experience more physical symptoms, such as backache, upset stomach, diarrhea, and acne, on specific days in which self-reported LCU values are considerably higher than normal, such as the day of a family member's wedding.

    The SRRS remains one of the most well-known instruments in the study of stress, and it is a useful tool for identifying potential stress-related health outcomes. It provides researchers a simple, easy-to-administer way of assessing the amount of stress in people's lives, and it has been used in hundreds of studies. Despite its widespread use, the scale has been subject to criticism.

    Source : learn.vccs.edu

    _____ is a general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one’s job.

    _____ is a general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one’s job. - 26816622

    Unlock all answers 03/03/2022 Social Studies High School answered

    _____ is a general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one’s job.

    Log in to add comment

    Advertisement

    Answer

    5.0/5 0

    Burnout is a psychological syndrome emerging as a prolonged response to chronic interpersonal stressors on the job. The three key dimensions of this response are an overwhelming exhaustion, feelings of cynicism and detachment from the job, and a sense of ineffectiveness and lack of accomplishment.

    kattyahto8 and 1 more users found this answer helpful

    5.0 (1 vote) Obviously copied.

    Log in to add comment

    Advertisement

    Answer

    5.0/5 0

    Burnout is a response to stressors.

    ahlukileoi and 1 more users found this answer helpful

    5.0 (1 vote)

    Log in to add comment

    Advertisement Survey

    Did this page answer your question?

    Still have questions?

    Get more Answers for FREE

    Snap questions with the app

    Get help from the community

    Find expert explanations for textbooks

    View instant step-by-step math solutions

    Already have an account?

    New questions in Social Studies

    Which cause and effect relationship is correctly matched? (5 points)

    What is one example of a cyber-attack within the United States? (answers in the photo. Brainly said it was offensive.)

    When the colonists said they were going to dissolve their political bands with Britain, they meant that they were going to ________ these bands.

    know the eighth amendment protection against cruel and unusual punishments has sparked debate over what issue

    According to the quotation, what did President Reagan believe about economic growth?

    Why do you think Hinduism is called the eternal religion? ​

    Rank the Mongol leaders from least important to most important based upon what you learned in the lesson. Explain the rank of each person and the reas…

    on for their ranking. 8. The module provides various examples of how ecosystems can be destroyed by humans and natural disasters. Describe one way an ecosystem can be destroyed by humans AND one way it can be destroyed naturally. PLEASE ANSWERR QUICKLY AND ANSWERR BOTH OF THESE QUESTIONS PLEASEEE THIS IS DUE IN 10 MINUTES. IF YOU GET THE ANSWER RIGHT YOU WILL GET 35 POINTS AND BRANLIEST.

    7) Who is John Brown and what was written in newspapers about his actions? I​

    Question One: What was the goal of Nationalust Groups? Question Two: Which nations had benefitted from nationalism? Question Three: Which nations were…

    harmed by nationalism? Question Four: How did Britain and Germany compete with each other? Question Five: Why was France opposed to Germany? Question Six: Why did many people believe that war would not happen?​

    Why would conducting trade by both caravans and ship be Lucrative for the Islamic world?​

    Previous Next

    Source : brainly.com

    Chapter 14 Flashcards

    Start studying Chapter 14. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Chapter 14

    stress

    Click card to see definition 👆

    a process whereby an individual perceives and responds to events that he appraises as overwhelming or threatening to his well-being.

    Click again to see term 👆

    burnout

    Click card to see definition 👆

    A general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one's job. (Due to stress at work)

    Frequently among those in human service jobs (e.g., social workers, teachers, therapists, and police officers). Job burnout consists of three dimensions. The first dimension is exhaustion, second, depersonalization: a sense of emotional detachment between the worker and the recipients of his services, often resulting in callous, cynical, or indifferent attitudes toward these individuals, third is diminished personal accomplishment, which is the tendency to evaluate one's work negatively by, for example, experiencing dissatisfaction with one's job-related accomplishments or feeling as though one has categorically failed to influence others' lives through one's work.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/25 Created by Viri_Guardado

    Textbook solutions for this set

    Myers' Psychology for AP

    2nd Edition David G Myers 900 explanations

    Psychology: Principles in Practice

    1st Edition Spencer A. Rathus 1,024 explanations

    Search for a textbook or question

    Terms in this set (25)

    stress

    a process whereby an individual perceives and responds to events that he appraises as overwhelming or threatening to his well-being.

    burnout

    A general sense of emotional exhaustion and cynicism in relation to one's job. (Due to stress at work)

    Frequently among those in human service jobs (e.g., social workers, teachers, therapists, and police officers). Job burnout consists of three dimensions. The first dimension is exhaustion, second, depersonalization: a sense of emotional detachment between the worker and the recipients of his services, often resulting in callous, cynical, or indifferent attitudes toward these individuals, third is diminished personal accomplishment, which is the tendency to evaluate one's work negatively by, for example, experiencing dissatisfaction with one's job-related accomplishments or feeling as though one has categorically failed to influence others' lives through one's work.

    Emotion-focused coping

    Consists of efforts to change or reduce the negative emotions associated with stress. These efforts may include avoiding, minimizing, or distancing oneself from the problem, or positive comparisons with others("I'm not as bad off as she is"), or seeking something positive in a negative event ("Now that I've been fired, I can sleep in for a few days")

    Taking your mind off of the situation

    problem-focused coping

    one attempts to manage or alter the problem that is causing one to experience stress. They typically involve identifying the problem, considering possible solutions, weighing the costs and benefits of these solutions, and then selecting an alternative.

    flow

    state involving intense engagement in an activity; usually is experienced when participating in creative, work, and leisure endeavors. When people experience flow, they become involved in an activity to the point where they feel they lose themselves in the activity.

    fight-or-flight response

    set of physiological reactions (increases in blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, and sweat) that occur when an individual encounters a perceived threat; these reactions are produced by activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the endocrine system

    coping

    mental or behavioral efforts used to manage problems relating to stress, including its cause and the unpleasant feelings and emotions it produces

    primary appraisal

    judgment about the degree of potential harm or threat to well-being that a stressor

    might entail secondary appraisal

    judgment of options available to cope with a stressor and their potential

    effectiveness type A

    psychological and behavior pattern exhibited by individuals who tend to be extremely competitive, impatient, rushed, and hostile toward others

    type B

    psychological and behavior pattern exhibited by a person who is relaxed and laid back

    1. Negative effects of stress are most likely to be experienced when an event is perceived as ________.

    a. negative, but it is likely to affect one's friends rather than oneself

    b. challenging c. confusing

    d. threatening, and no clear options for dealing with it are apparent

    D

    2. Between 2006 and 2009, the greatest increases in stress levels were found to occur among ________.

    a. Blacks b. those aged 45-64 c. the unemployed

    d. those without college degrees

    C

    3. At which stage of Selye's general adaptation syndrome is a person especially vulnerable to illness?

    a. exhaustion b. alarm reaction c. fight-or-flight d. resistance A

    4. During an encounter judged as stressful, cortisol is released by the ________.

    a. sympathetic nervous system

    b. hypothalamus c. pituitary gland d. adrenal glands D

    5. According to the Holmes and Rahe scale, which life event requires the greatest amount of readjustment? a. marriage

    Source : quizlet.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 12 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer